August 2014
Volume 14, Issue 10
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2014
The other-race effect of face processing: Upper and lower parts play different roles
Author Affiliations
  • Yu-Hao Sun
    Department of Psychology, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, PR China
  • Zhe Wang
    Department of Psychology, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, PR China
  • Paul Quinn
    Department of Psychology, University of Delaware, USA
  • Xiaoyang Yu
    Department of Psychology, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, PR China
  • Jim Tanaka
    Department of Psychology, University of Victoria, Canada
  • Olivier Pascalis
    Laboratoire de Psychologie et NeuroCognition, Université Pierre-Mendès-France, France
  • Kang Lee
    Institute of Child Study, University of Toronto, Canada
Journal of Vision August 2014, Vol.14, 1276. doi:10.1167/14.10.1276
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      Yu-Hao Sun, Zhe Wang, Paul Quinn, Xiaoyang Yu, Jim Tanaka, Olivier Pascalis, Kang Lee; The other-race effect of face processing: Upper and lower parts play different roles. Journal of Vision 2014;14(10):1276. doi: 10.1167/14.10.1276.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

We investigated whether individuals would show differential sensitivity to configural and featural changes in different regions of own- and other-race faces. Using the Face Dimensions Test, we systematically varied the size of key facial features (eyes and mouth) of own-race Chinese faces and other-race Caucasian faces, and the configuration (spacing) between eyes and between eyes and mouth of the two types of faces. The feature size and spacing between features were manipulated on three levels: small, medium, and large. On each trial, when a pair of faces (both Caucasian or both Chinese) was presented side by side, participants were asked to discriminate between them. Results revealed that the ORE is more pronounced when featural and spacing change was in the upper region than in the lower region of the face. Participants performed significantly better for own-race face pairs than other-race face pairs when size and spacing change were in upper region of the faces (i.e., eye size and the distance between two eyes), but not when size and spacing change were in lower region of the faces (i.e., mouth size and the distance between nose and mouth). These findings reveal that information from different regions of the face contributes differentially to the robust difference in recognition between own- and other-race faces.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2014

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