August 2014
Volume 14, Issue 10
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2014
The time course of visual information extraction for identifying and categorizing same and other-race faces in Caucasian observers
Author Affiliations
  • Sandra Lafortune
    Département de Psychologie, Université du Québec en Outaouais
  • Caroline Blais
    Département de Psychologie, Université du Québec en Outaouais
  • Karolann Robinson
    Département de Psychologie, Université du Québec en Outaouais
  • Jessica Royer
    Département de Psychologie, Université du Québec en Outaouais
  • Justin Duncan
    Département de Psychologie, Université du Québec en Outaouais
  • Jessica Tardif
    Département de Psychologie, Université du Québec en Outaouais
  • Daniel Fiset
    Département de Psychologie, Université du Québec en Outaouais
Journal of Vision August 2014, Vol.14, 1279. doi:10.1167/14.10.1279
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      Sandra Lafortune, Caroline Blais, Karolann Robinson, Jessica Royer, Justin Duncan, Jessica Tardif, Daniel Fiset; The time course of visual information extraction for identifying and categorizing same and other-race faces in Caucasian observers. Journal of Vision 2014;14(10):1279. doi: 10.1167/14.10.1279.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

It has been proposed that the categorization of a face as part of an ethnic group occurs spontaneously, whereas its individuation is effortful (Hugenberg et al., 2010). In this framework, the other-race effect (ORE) arises from a tendency to attend race-specific, as opposed to identity-specific, features. Here, dynamic Bubbles (Vinette et al., 2004) were used to investigate the time course of feature utilization during the identification and categorization of same-race (SR) and other-race (OR) faces. The stimuli consisted of 300ms movies displaying a face (8 Caucasian, 8 African-American) in which information was randomly sampled through time. On each trial, the participant (N=8, 9600 trials) had to decide which of the 16 identities was presented. The number of bubbles was adjusted such that on 15% of the trials, race-categorization errors occurred (erroneous identification of a face of the wrong ethnicity). This manipulation allowed us to reveal, using a single task, identity-specific and race-specific information. On average, the participants correctly identified 39.9% of the SR, and 27.4% of the OR, faces, replicating the ORE [t(7)=4.01, p<0.05]. We first computed static classification images (CI) showing race-specific and identity-specific visual information by performing a multiple linear regression on the bubbles’ spatial and temporal locations and accuracy at categorizing or identifying faces. Diagnostic identity-specific information was located in the eye region, whereas race-specific information was located on the left nostril and the whiter part of the eyes (Zcrit=3.98, p<0.05). We then constructed dynamic CIs separately for SR and OR faces showing the time course of information utilization for identification and categorization. We correlated each frame of the dynamic CIs with the identity- or race-specific CIs. The results show that for SR faces, identity-specific information is processed earlier and more thoroughly, whereas for OR faces, it is the race-specific information that is treated as such.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2014

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