December 2014
Volume 14, Issue 15
Free
OSA Fall Vision Meeting Abstract  |   December 2014
Arginylation affects G-protein signaling and visual processing in the retina
Author Affiliations
  • Dawei Dong
    Department of Animal Biology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania
  • Marie Fina
    Department of Animal Biology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania
  • Sergei Nikonov
    Department of Neuroscience, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania
  • Noga Vardi
    Department of Neuroscience, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania
  • Junling Wang
    Department of Animal Biology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania
  • Anna Kashina
    Department of Animal Biology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania
Journal of Vision December 2014, Vol.14, 59. doi:10.1167/14.15.59
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      Dawei Dong, Marie Fina, Sergei Nikonov, Noga Vardi, Junling Wang, Anna Kashina; Arginylation affects G-protein signaling and visual processing in the retina. Journal of Vision 2014;14(15):59. doi: 10.1167/14.15.59.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Arginylation is a posttranslational modification that has been recently implicated in multiple key processes in development and physiology. Here we studied the effect of the neuron-specific knockout of arginyltransferase (Ate1) on visual processing in the retina using a conditional knockout model with Ate1 deletion driven by brain-specific Nestin (Nes) promoter. Electroretinography studies showed a thirty percent increase of the response of the dark-adapted retina bipolar neurons to dim light flashes in Nes-Ate1 mice compared to age-matched controls. Immunohistochemistry of retina sections showed an increase in one of the regulators of G-protein signaling (RGS) in Ate1 knockout, likely due to inhibition of its arginylation-dependent degradation by the N-end rule pathway. Since the dim-light responses in bipolar neurons are facilitated by RGSs accelerating G-proteins' GTP hydrolysis rates, increased RGS protein levels leads to increased dim-light responses. Our data suggest that Ate1-mediated arginylation affects G-protein signaling in the retina by regulating RGS proteins, facilitating the proper balance of RGS family members in the healthy retina, and ensuring normal processing of visual stimuli in the healthy animals. Supported by NIH/NEI P30 EY001583, NIH/NIGMS R01 GM104003 and R01 GM108744, and University Research Foundation, University of Pennsylvania

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