December 2014
Volume 14, Issue 15
Free
OSA Fall Vision Meeting Abstract  |   December 2014
Brown induction is both quick and proximity dependent
Author Affiliations
  • Steven Buck
    Department of Psychology, University of Washington
  • Vina Hadyanto
    Department of Psychology, University of Washington
  • Miaolu Tang
    Department of Psychology, University of Washington
  • Takuma Morimoto
    Department of Information Processing, Tokyo Institute of Technology
Journal of Vision December 2014, Vol.14, 73. doi:10.1167/14.15.73
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      Steven Buck, Vina Hadyanto, Miaolu Tang, Takuma Morimoto; Brown induction is both quick and proximity dependent. Journal of Vision 2014;14(15):73. doi: 10.1167/14.15.73.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Bright surround stimuli will change the hue of a target from yellow to brown. To help characterize the mechanisms of brown induction, we ask how fast this occurs and whether the latency depends on the proximity of surround stimuli to the target. Five observers viewed a 2° diameter foveal target disk surrounded by a large, bright (124 cd/m2 CIE 1964) annular surround with a gap of 0°, 0.25° or 1° between target and surround. Both surround and target stimuli were presented for either 1 s or 30 ms, with only small fixation dots visible for 3 s between stimulus presentations. Observers adjusted the luminance of the target to the highest light level at which the target appeared pure brown, with no trace of yellow: the higher this “brown boundary”, the more effective the surround is at inducing brown. This boundary varied from 1 to 13 cd/m2 under the present conditions. We found that brown induction (a) occurs rapidly (within 30 ms) and strengthens slightly with longer-duration (1 s) stimuli, and (b) becomes stronger with closer proximity of target and surround regardless of stimulus duration. Thus, brown induction is found for brief stimuli and maintains both strength and proximity dependence with longer test duration. In this regard, brown induction differs from brightness contrast, which loses both strength and proximity dependence with increased stimulus duration, and from color contrast, which loses strength but not proximity dependence with increased stimulus duration (Kaneko & Murikama, 2013).

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