September 2015
Volume 15, Issue 12
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2015
Angry expression detriment recognition decision of face memory: a diffusion model analysis
Author Affiliations
  • Wenfeng Chen
    State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Science, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences
  • Ke Tong
    State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Science, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences
  • Wei Tang
    State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Science, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences
  • Huiyun Li
    State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Science, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences
  • Naixin Ren
    State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Science, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences
  • Xiaolan Fu
    State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Science, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences
Journal of Vision September 2015, Vol.15, 138. doi:10.1167/15.12.138
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      Wenfeng Chen, Ke Tong, Wei Tang, Huiyun Li, Naixin Ren, Xiaolan Fu; Angry expression detriment recognition decision of face memory: a diffusion model analysis. Journal of Vision 2015;15(12):138. doi: 10.1167/15.12.138.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

It is known that emotion at encoding and consolidation memory can largely modulate face memory. However, how emotional cues at retrieval plays their roles remains unclear (Phaf & Rotteveel, 2005; Sergerie, Lepage, & Armony, 2007). Here we investigated the independent modulation of emotional cue on face recognition decision without the emotional impact at encoding and consolidation, and demonstrated how face recognition may be affected by facial expression at retrieval in terms of diffusion model decision biases. By comparing memory performance of angry, happy and neutral faces learned with neutral expression in a standard old/new recognition task, we found higher threshold separation (a), lower drift rate (v), lower starting point (z) for angry expression cue relative to happy expression cue, indicating a detrimental effect of angry expression cue on face recognition decision. Overall, these results suggested that an old/new decision for angry faces is characterized with the larger amount of information and the slower speed of information accumulation, which may result from the impaired holistic processing of angry faces (Curby, Johnson, & Tyson, 2012). It also indicated that a priori biases to “old” response of angry face with higher false alarm rate

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015

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