September 2015
Volume 15, Issue 12
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2015
Spatial frequency hemispheric specialization for filtered faces depends on temporal constraints
Author Affiliations
  • Rui de Moraes Júnior
    Department of Psychology, University of São Paulo School of Optometry, University of Montreal
  • Rafael Vasques
    Department of Psychology, University of São Paulo
  • André Cravo
    Center for Mathematics, Computation and Cognition, Federal University of ABC
  • Jocelyn Faubert
    School of Optometry, University of Montreal
  • Sérgio Fukusima
    Department of Psychology, University of São Paulo
Journal of Vision September 2015, Vol.15, 682. doi:10.1167/15.12.682
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Rui de Moraes Júnior, Rafael Vasques, André Cravo, Jocelyn Faubert, Sérgio Fukusima; Spatial frequency hemispheric specialization for filtered faces depends on temporal constraints. Journal of Vision 2015;15(12):682. doi: 10.1167/15.12.682.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

This study aimed to investigate how the brain hemispheres use spatial frequencies (SF) information at early stages of visual processing for facial recognition. Thirty participants performed a matching task in which a target face was presented centered on the screen and followed by a probe face in each trial. The probe face was presented lateralized under 3 SF conditions (high, low and broad spatial frequencies) and 2 exposure time conditions (70 and 150 ms). The participants had to judge whether both faces in each trial were from the same person. The results of d' suggest that the right hemisphere is specialized for low SF processing in high temporal constraint, but the left hemisphere is not for high SF. However, high-pass faces were better processed by the left hemisphere. The response time in short time conditions showed that facial recognition is better in the right hemisphere. High-pass faces are slowly processed by the left hemisphere, but with longer exposure time it becomes equivalent to the recognition of low-pass and broadband faces. We conclude that there is a right hemisphere dominance for low SF in brief exposures, but as time progresses high SF are better processed and asymmetry effects are attenuated. Keywords: Spatial frequencies; Coarse-to-fine processing, Brain asymmetry; Face perception.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×