September 2015
Volume 15, Issue 12
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2015
Synchronization is better to a visual than to an auditory beat
Author Affiliations
  • Xiang Wu
    Department of Psychology, Sun Yat-Sen University
  • Lingyu Gan
    Department of Psychology, Sun Yat-Sen University
  • Yingyu Huang
    Department of Psychology, Sun Yat-Sen University
  • Liang Zhou
    Department of Psychology, Sun Yat-Sen University
  • Cheng Qian
    Department of Psychology, Sun Yat-Sen University
Journal of Vision September 2015, Vol.15, 710. doi:10.1167/15.12.710
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Xiang Wu, Lingyu Gan, Yingyu Huang, Liang Zhou, Cheng Qian; Synchronization is better to a visual than to an auditory beat. Journal of Vision 2015;15(12):710. doi: 10.1167/15.12.710.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Daily music experience involves synchronizing movements in time with a perceived periodic beat. It has been established for over a century that beat synchronization is substantially less stable for the visual than for the auditory modality. This auditory advantage of beat synchronization gives rise to the hypotheses that the neural and evolutionary mechanisms underlying beat synchronization are modality-specific. Here, however, we found that synchronization to a periodically bouncing ball that was close to real-world moving visual experience was more stable than synchronization to an auditory metronome, demonstrating that humans can synchronize better to a visual than to an auditory beat. This finding challenges the auditory advantage of beat synchronization, and has important implications for the understanding of the biological substrates of beat synchronization.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×