September 2015
Volume 15, Issue 12
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2015
Visual and Haptic Shape Recognition Memory
Author Affiliations
  • J Farley Norman
    Department of Psychological Sciences, Ogden College of Science and Engineering, Western Kentucky University
  • Jacob Cheeseman
    Department of Psychological Sciences, Ogden College of Science and Engineering, Western Kentucky University
  • Olivia Adkins
    Department of Psychological Sciences, Ogden College of Science and Engineering, Western Kentucky University
  • Connor Rogers
    Department of Psychological Sciences, Ogden College of Science and Engineering, Western Kentucky University
  • Andrea Cox
    Department of Psychological Sciences, Ogden College of Science and Engineering, Western Kentucky University
  • Michael Baxter
    Department of Psychological Sciences, Ogden College of Science and Engineering, Western Kentucky University
  • Hideko Norman
    Department of Psychological Sciences, Ogden College of Science and Engineering, Western Kentucky University
Journal of Vision September 2015, Vol.15, 865. doi:10.1167/15.12.865
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    • Get Citation

      J Farley Norman, Jacob Cheeseman, Olivia Adkins, Connor Rogers, Andrea Cox, Michael Baxter, Hideko Norman; Visual and Haptic Shape Recognition Memory. Journal of Vision 2015;15(12):865. doi: 10.1167/15.12.865.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Little is known about memory for solid (3-D) shape, especially for unfamiliar naturally-shaped objects. In the current Experiment 1, participants haptically explored or viewed a set of six bell peppers (Capsicum annuum) either once, four times, or seven times. On each study trial, the participants either viewed or haptically explored a particular bell pepper for 15 seconds. The participants’ recognition memory was tested immediately. Twelve bell peppers were then presented (visually or haptically); the participants judged whether each one was either old (previously presented during the study phase) or new. Recognition performance was similar for vision and haptics when each of the original bell peppers was studied once. However, when the original bell peppers were studied multiple times (4 or 7 times), the participants’ visual recognition performance was higher (by 33.7 percent) than that obtained for haptics. The procedure used for Experiment 2 was identical (objects were studied 4 times), except that a 10- or 20-minute delay was inserted in between the study and test sessions. There was no effect of delay upon haptic shape recognition. In contrast, a 10- or 20-minute delay produced substantial reductions in performance for visual shape recognition. Overall, visual solid shape memory was superior to haptic shape memory, especially when memory was tested immediately.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015

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