September 2015
Volume 15, Issue 12
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2015
Feature priming rather than visual working memory affects oculomotor selection in a bottom-up manner
Author Affiliations
  • Jeroen Silvis
    Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Department of Cognitive Psychology
  • Artem Belopolsky
    Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Department of Cognitive Psychology
  • Jozua Murris
    Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Department of Cognitive Psychology
  • Mieke Donk
    Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Department of Cognitive Psychology
Journal of Vision September 2015, Vol.15, 870. doi:10.1167/15.12.870
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      Jeroen Silvis, Artem Belopolsky, Jozua Murris, Mieke Donk; Feature priming rather than visual working memory affects oculomotor selection in a bottom-up manner. Journal of Vision 2015;15(12):870. doi: 10.1167/15.12.870.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

It has been demonstrated that objects held in working memory can influence rapid oculomotor selection. This has been taken as evidence that perceptual salience can be modified by active working memory (e.g. Hollingworth, Matsukura & Luck, 2013). The goal of the present study was to examine whether these results could be better explained by feature-based bottom-up priming. In two experiments, participants were asked to saccade to a target line segment that was presented together with a to-be-ignored distractor. Both objects were given a task-irrelevant color that varied per trial. In a secondary task, a color had to be memorized, a color that either matched the target, the distractor, or none of the objects in the eye movement task. The memory task was completed either after the eye movement task (Experiment 1), or before (Experiment 2). The results showed that memory content biased oculomotor selection, an effect that was most pronounced for short-latency saccades. Crucially, this effect was similar in both experiments. This suggests that bottom-up feature priming rather than the active maintenance in VWM is the driving force behind early biases in oculomotor selection.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015

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