September 2015
Volume 15, Issue 12
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2015
Representing dynamic stimulus information during occlusion
Author Affiliations
  • Jim Maarseveen
    Utrecht University, Helmholtz Institute, Department of Experimental Psychology, The Netherlands
  • Chris Paffen
    Utrecht University, Helmholtz Institute, Department of Experimental Psychology, The Netherlands
  • Frans Verstraten
    Utrecht University, Helmholtz Institute, Department of Experimental Psychology, The Netherlands University of Sydney, Faculty of Science, School of Psychology, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
  • Hinze Hogendoorn
    Utrecht University, Helmholtz Institute, Department of Experimental Psychology, The Netherlands
Journal of Vision September 2015, Vol.15, 1027. doi:10.1167/15.12.1027
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      Jim Maarseveen, Chris Paffen, Frans Verstraten, Hinze Hogendoorn; Representing dynamic stimulus information during occlusion. Journal of Vision 2015;15(12):1027. doi: 10.1167/15.12.1027.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

When an object becomes occluded, many of its visual features (e.g. its colour or form) remain represented by the observer. Here we investigated whether changes in the object’s visual features and the rate at which these changes occur, are also represented during occlusion. We focused on the temporal frequency content of a contrast-modulated stimulus. It has been shown that an increase in a stimulus’ temporal frequency content causes an increase in its perceived duration (Kanai et al., 2006). If this temporal frequency induced time dilation also occurs in situations were the object becomes occluded, it provides evidence that information about temporal frequency content is represented during occlusion. Observers performed an online duration judgement task in which they matched the duration of a contrast modulated test stimulus (static, 4Hz, or 8Hz) to a previously presented (static) standard stimulus (600, 800, 1000, or 1200 ms in duration). During the test phase a black square moved behind or in front of the stimulus, causing it to either remain visible or to become occluded after a short delay. The results show that compared to the 4Hz and static conditions, the duration of the 8Hz condition was perceived to be longer (i.e. time dilation). This temporal frequency induced time dilation occurred both when the object was continuously visible and, more importantly, when it became occluded. Additionally, the amount of time dilation for the different standard durations did not differ between the two visibility conditions. Our findings show that dynamic stimulus properties are maintained in the representation of an object, even when it is temporarily occluded and therefore not visible. Furthermore, this representation affects the timing of the occluded object in a similar fashion as to when the object remains visible.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015

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