September 2015
Volume 15, Issue 12
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2015
Modulation of intracranial field potential responses in the human large-scale attention network during a spatial attention task
Author Affiliations
  • Anne Martin
    Princeton Neuroscience Institute, Princeton University
  • Liang Wang
    Princeton Neuroscience Institute, Princeton University Department of Psychology, Princeton University
  • Yuri Saalmann
    Princeton Neuroscience Institute, Princeton University Department of Psychology, Princeton University
  • Avgusta Shestyuk
    Department of Psychology, University of California Berkeley Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, University of California Berkeley
  • Su Keun Jeong
    Princeton Neuroscience Institute, Princeton University
  • Nathan Crone
    Department of Neurology, The Johns Hopkins Hospital
  • Josef Parvizi
    Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine
  • Robert Knight
    Department of Psychology, University of California Berkeley Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, University of California Berkeley
  • Sabine Kastner
    Princeton Neuroscience Institute, Princeton University Department of Psychology, Princeton University
Journal of Vision September 2015, Vol.15, 1055. doi:10.1167/15.12.1055
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Anne Martin, Liang Wang, Yuri Saalmann, Avgusta Shestyuk, Su Keun Jeong, Nathan Crone, Josef Parvizi, Robert Knight, Sabine Kastner; Modulation of intracranial field potential responses in the human large-scale attention network during a spatial attention task. Journal of Vision 2015;15(12):1055. doi: 10.1167/15.12.1055.

      Download citation file:


      © 2017 Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology.

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Spatial attention is mediated through a large-scale network that includes occipital, temporal, parietal and frontal cortical regions. While the network architecture has been well characterized using neuroimaging methods, less is known about the temporal dynamics in local regions and across the network. Here, we explored the modulatory effects of spatial attention throughout this cortical network by analyzing intracranial field potentials recorded from 538 ECoG electrodes implanted in 6 epilepsy patients. We examined the effects of attention using a variant of the Eriksen flanker task, where subjects were cued by an exogenous stimulus to the spatial location of an upcoming target stimulus which, after a variable delay period, was presented embedded in a circular array of shapes. Subjects had to differentiate between barrel or bowtie target stimuli flanked either by congruent or incongruent shapes. Using our probabilistic atlas of the human visual system, we localized the recorded ECoG signals to topographically organized brain areas and linked them to functional brain imaging data from normal subjects. We found spatially constrained visual response fields in 175 electrodes, as indicated by differential cue-related activity, obtained from both induced broadband power and evoked potentials. We examined response modulation from those electrodes during the delay period of the task when subjects either attended to or away from the response field. Further, we related these results to changes in the BOLD signal measured in normal subjects performing the same task. We found that covert spatial attention affected evoked event-related potentials and induced low frequency (4-20Hz) and broadband high gamma (50-200Hz) power differentially along the dorsal pathway through nodes of the fronto-parietal attention network, from V1 through intraparietal sulcus areas IPS0-IPS5 and the frontal eye fields.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×