September 2015
Volume 15, Issue 12
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2015
Orientation, Rotary Motion, and Congruency Effects: Models of Visual Object Identification
Author Affiliations
  • James Ryland
    The University of Texas at Dallas
  • Alice O'Toole
    The University of Texas at Dallas
  • Richard Golden
    The University of Texas at Dallas
Journal of Vision September 2015, Vol.15, 1092. doi:10.1167/15.12.1092
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      James Ryland, Alice O'Toole, Richard Golden; Orientation, Rotary Motion, and Congruency Effects: Models of Visual Object Identification. Journal of Vision 2015;15(12):1092. doi: 10.1167/15.12.1092.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

We developed a computational model of object identification (HAT-F) that is consistent with the Transformational Framework of Recognition (TFR) (Graf, 2006) and tested it as a model of human object recognition. The HAT-F model combines convolution, coordinate adjustment, and multiple-view templates. The TFR proposes that a hybrid of coordinate adjustment and multiple-views could account for human recognition phenomena that static retinotopic theories fail to predict. To test this claim, we specifically examined the accord between human and HAT-F’s object recognition performance: a) across novel orientations in the image plane, b) while rotating, and c) when preceded by unrelated primes in either congruent or incongruent orientations. In addition, we compared HAT-F against models consistent with invariant representation and multiple-view theories. We examined HAT-F’s accuracy and reaction times when classifying learned objects (N = 150) from the Revised Snodgrass set in unlearned image orientations (Rossion, 2004). Consistent with human behavior (e.g. Lawson, 2003), HAT-F’s accuracy varied according to a W-shaped curve over orientation (R2 = 0.9491); reaction time varied according to an inverse W-shaped curve (R2 = 0.9215). The multiple-view and invariant representation models displayed accuracy curves uncharacteristic of human object recognition behavior. The qualitative difference between accuracy curves for the three approaches was statistically reliable, F(22, 3278) = 61.85, MSe = 0.054, p < 1x10-15. Additionally, HAT-F was more accurate at recognizing objects preceded by primes in congruent orientations, F(1, 99) = 49.86, MSe = 0.163, p < 2.31x10-10 and at recognizing objects rotating towards an upright orientation, F(1, 149) = 22.39, MSe = 0.0788, p < 5.13x10-06. Both effects match human behavior (e.g. Graf, 2005; Jolicoeur, 1992). These results indicate that a combination of convolution, transformation, and multiple-view models can account for planar orientation effects, rotary motion effects, and orientation congruency effects, partially validating the TFR’s claim.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×