September 2015
Volume 15, Issue 12
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2015
Object-based attention influences saccade latency
Author Affiliations
  • Gozde Senturk
    Department of Psychology, Michigan State University
  • Adam Greenberg
    Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
  • Taosheng Liu
    Department of Psychology, Michigan State University
Journal of Vision September 2015, Vol.15, 1262. doi:10.1167/15.12.1262
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Gozde Senturk, Adam Greenberg, Taosheng Liu; Object-based attention influences saccade latency. Journal of Vision 2015;15(12):1262. doi: 10.1167/15.12.1262.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

In the influential two-rectangle paradigm, attention is preferentially allocated to cued objects over noncued objects (Egly et al, 1994). Improved performance within the cued object manifests itself as a manual reaction time and accuracy advantage. However, no study to date has systematically investigated how saccadic reaction time is affected by object-based attention. Our goal is to determine whether saccade latencies are affected by space-based attention alone or whether object-based attention also plays a role. We employed a modified version of the classic two-rectangle paradigm coupled with a saccade reaction time task. Two horizontal or vertical rectangles (orientation blocked), were presented with an exogenous spatial cue flashed at one end of one rectangle. A target gray disk then appeared at one end of one object on 80% of trials (20% target absent). Of target present trials, 75% were valid trials in which the target appeared at the cued location, and on invalid trials (25%) the target appeared equally likely at the uncued end of the cued object (invalid-same object), or at an equidistant location on the uncued object (invalid-different object). Participants were instructed to make a single saccade to the target. Results showed that the saccadic latency was fastest on valid trials. Moreover, saccadic latency was significantly faster during invalid-same object trials versus invalid-different object trials. This effect was found for both the vertical and horizontal rectangle configurations. These results indicate that the oculomotor system is not only involved in location-based saccade preparation, but it is also guided by object-based attention. The eye-movement planning system may, therefore, be subject to the same boundary conditions that determine the representational basis of attentional selection in the visual scene.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×