February 2016
Volume 16, Issue 4
Open Access
OSA Fall Vision Meeting Abstract  |   February 2016
Visual Stability of Virtual Objects and Virtual Environments During Movement
Author Affiliations
  • Stephen R. Ellis
    NASA Ames Research Center
  • Bearnard D. Adelstein
    NASA Ames Research Center
Journal of Vision February 2016, Vol.16, 15. doi:10.1167/16.4.5
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      Stephen R. Ellis, Bearnard D. Adelstein; Visual Stability of Virtual Objects and Virtual Environments During Movement. Journal of Vision 2016;16(4):15. doi: 10.1167/16.4.5.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Virtual Environments (aka Virtual Reality) is again catching the public imagination and a number of startups (e.g. Oculus) and even not-so-startup companies (e.g. Microsoft) are trying to develop display systems to capitalize on this renewed interest. All acknowledge that this time they will “get it right” by providing the required dynamic fidelity, visual quality, and interesting content for the concept of VR to take off and change the world in ways it failed to do so in past incarnations. Some of the surprisingly long historical background of the technology that the form of direct simulation that underlies virtual environment and augmented reality displays will be briefly reviewed. An example of a mid 1990's augmented reality display system with good dynamic performance from our lab will be used to illustrate some of the underlying phenomena and technology concerning visual stability during movement. In conclusion some idealized performance characteristics for a reference system will be proposed. Interestingly, many systems more or less on the market now may actually meet many of these proposed technical requirements. This observation leads to the conclusion that the current success of the IT firms trying to commercialize the technology will depend on the hidden costs of using the systems as well as the development of interesting and compelling content.

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