August 2016
Volume 16, Issue 12
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Macroanatomical alignment improves the intersubject consistency of cytoarchitectonic regions in the human ventral stream
Author Affiliations
  • Mona Rosenke
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA
  • Kevin Weiner
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA
  • Martin Frost
    Faculty of Psychology and Neuroscience, Maastricht University, The Netherlands
  • Michael Barnett
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA
  • Karl Zilles
    Institute for Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-1), and JARA Brain, Research Center Juelich, Juelich, Germany
  • Katrin Amunts
    Institute for Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-1), and JARA Brain, Research Center Juelich, Juelich, Germany
  • Rainer Goebel
    Faculty of Psychology and Neuroscience, Maastricht University, The Netherlands
  • Kalanit Grill-Spector
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA
Journal of Vision September 2016, Vol.16, 179. doi:10.1167/16.12.179
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      Mona Rosenke, Kevin Weiner, Martin Frost, Michael Barnett, Karl Zilles, Katrin Amunts, Rainer Goebel, Kalanit Grill-Spector; Macroanatomical alignment improves the intersubject consistency of cytoarchitectonic regions in the human ventral stream. Journal of Vision 2016;16(12):179. doi: 10.1167/16.12.179.

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      © 2017 Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology.

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Abstract

Eight cytoarchitectonic regions (cROIs) have been identified in the human ventral stream including the primary visual cortex and and higher visual areas (Amunts et al., 2000; Rottschy et al., 2007, Caspers et al., 2013; Lorenz et al., 2015). While hOc1 is consistently located in the calcarine sulcus (Fischl et al., 2008), it is unknown whether such a correspondence between cROIs and anatomical landmarks persists in higher-level regions. We hypothesized that if such a correspondence exists, cortex-based alignment (CBA) of cROIs will yield better consistency across subjects than volume-based alignment. Each of the 8 cROIs was projected to the cortical surface of each subject's brain. We then generated a group map of each cROI by transforming individual subjects' cROIs into a common anatomical space (Figure 1) using three types of alignments: (1) volume-based alignment to the MNI template, (2) CBA to a template cortical surface, either the Freesurfer average brain (CBAfs) or average of the 9 PM brains (CBApm), and (3) CBA with additional constraints of the mid fusiform sulcus and collateral sulcus (CBApm+MFS+CoS). We examined which method produced the most accurate group cROI. Results show that CBAfs and CBApm alignments significantly improve the across-subject correspondence of the 8 cROIs compared to volume alignment (F(2,34) = 31.418, p < .001, Figure 2). Further, adding the MFS and CoS to the alignment significantly reduces inter-subject variability in the location of the FG1/FG2 boundary (p < .05, permutation test, Figure 3) but not the FG3/FG4 boundary compared to both CBA approaches, Overall, these results suggest that CBA generates more accurate atlases of the cytoarchitectonic structure of the ventral stream by preserving the location of cROIs relative to the cortical folding. Further, adding ventral stream sulci as constraints to the CBA improves the accuracy of localizing the boundaries between cROIs

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2016

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