August 2016
Volume 16, Issue 12
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Gender differences in visual perception
Author Affiliations
  • Albulena Shaqiri
    Laboratory of Psychophysics, Brain Mind Institute, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Switzerland
  • Andreas Brand
    Institute for Psychology and Cognition Research, University Bremen, Bremen, Germany
  • Maya Roinishvili
    Institute of Cognitive Neurosciences, Agricultural University of Georgia, Tbilisi, Georgia
  • Marina Kunchulia
    Institute of Cognitive Neurosciences, Agricultural University of Georgia, Tbilisi, Georgia
  • Guillaume Sierro
    Institute of Psychology, Faculty of Social and Political Sciences, Bâtiment Geopolis, Quartier Mouline, Lausanne, Switzerland
  • Julie Willemin
    Institute of Psychology, Faculty of Social and Political Sciences, Bâtiment Geopolis, Quartier Mouline, Lausanne, Switzerland
  • Eka Chkonia
    Institute of Cognitive Neurosciences, Agricultural University of Georgia, Tbilisi, Georgia
  • Luisa Iannantuoni
    Institute of Psychology, Faculty of Social and Political Sciences, Bâtiment Geopolis, Quartier Mouline, Lausanne, Switzerland
  • Karin Pilz
    School of Psychology, University of Aberdeen, Scotland, UK
  • Christine Mohr
    Institute of Psychology, Faculty of Social and Political Sciences, Bâtiment Geopolis, Quartier Mouline, Lausanne, Switzerland
  • Michael Herzog
    Laboratory of Psychophysics, Brain Mind Institute, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Switzerland
Journal of Vision September 2016, Vol.16, 207. doi:10.1167/16.12.207
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      Albulena Shaqiri, Andreas Brand, Maya Roinishvili, Marina Kunchulia, Guillaume Sierro, Julie Willemin, Eka Chkonia, Luisa Iannantuoni, Karin Pilz, Christine Mohr, Michael Herzog; Gender differences in visual perception . Journal of Vision 2016;16(12):207. doi: 10.1167/16.12.207.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Gender differences are well established in cognition and somato-sensation, but there are almost no studies on gender differences in visual perception. In vision experiments, sample size of participants is often small because effect sizes are large. However, small samples are not well suited to test for gender differences. Here, we pooled data from 4 studies resulting in 1091 participants ranging in age from 14 to 90 years. We tested participants' performance in visual and vernier acuity, visual backward masking and the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test. We found no gender differences in any of the four tests for younger participants (n=431; 14-30 years old). Even in a subgroup of schizophrenia patients (n=291), we did not find gender differences, but large performance deficits in patients compared to controls. For middle-aged participants (n=185; 31-59 years old), men performed significantly better than women in all perceptual tests, even when we controlled for age. We also found better performance of men compared to women in vernier duration in older participants (n=183; 60-90 years old) and trends in the same direction for the other tests. Hence, it may be that women's performance deteriorates with age more strongly than men's performance. We did not find any difference in the Wisconsin card sorting test, indicating no gender differences for executive functions.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2016

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