August 2016
Volume 16, Issue 12
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Effect of Viewpoint Change in Implicit Learning of a Scene: Evidence from Contextual Cueing Paradigm
Author Affiliations
  • Shiyi Li
    Academy of Psychology and Behavior, Tianjin Normal University
  • Chao Wang
    Academy of Psychology and Behavior, Tianjin Normal University
  • Xuejun Bai
    Academy of Psychology and Behavior, Tianjin Normal University
  • Hong-Jin Sun
    Department of Psychology, Neuroscience & Behaviour, McMaster University
Journal of Vision September 2016, Vol.16, 320. doi:10.1167/16.12.320
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      Shiyi Li, Chao Wang, Xuejun Bai, Hong-Jin Sun; Effect of Viewpoint Change in Implicit Learning of a Scene: Evidence from Contextual Cueing Paradigm. Journal of Vision 2016;16(12):320. doi: 10.1167/16.12.320.

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      © 2017 Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology.

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Abstract

Repeated configurations of random elements induce a better search performance than that of the novel random configurations (contextual cueing effect, Chun and Jiang, 1998). We examined the effect of viewpoint change of a scene in a contextual cueing paradigm using a computer rendered illustration of a realistic scene. The scene contained an array of chairs of different shapes which were randomly positioned on the ground but oriented coherently. Observers were required to search for and identified an arbitrarily located target letter positioned on the surface of the seat of a chair. Half of the scenes were repeated over blocks and the other half were not. A typical contextual cueing effect (faster search for the repeated scenes than the novel scenes) were found. Following learning, participants continued to perform the search task (testing phase), but orientation of the entire scene (Experiment 1) or individual chairs (Experiment 2) was either changed (experimental group) or not (control group). For the experimental group, in Experiment 1, the viewpoint of the scene was rotated 45°. Moreover, a video illustrating such change for one typical scene was presented to the participants before the testing phase. In Experiment 2, the experimental group viewed the same video as in Experiment 1, but during the testing phase the viewpoint of the scene did not change, instead, each chair rotated in place 45° in the ground plane, creating a false sense of viewpoint change (or scene rotation). In the testing phase, contextual cueing effect was still evident (although with some reduction) in Experiment 1 but not in Experiment 2. These results suggest that implicit learning can be transferred to a new viewpoint and such transfer could be achieved through mental update of the view. Such update appears to be automatic and prompted by proper cues about rotation.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2016

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