August 2016
Volume 16, Issue 12
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Overlap in performance of CNN's, human behavior and EEG classification
Author Affiliations
  • Noor Seijdel
    Department of Psychology, Brain and Cognition, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands
  • Kandan Ramakrishnan
    Intelligent Systems Lab Amsterdam, Institute of Informatics, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands
  • Max Losch
    Department of Psychology, Brain and Cognition, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands
  • Steven Scholte
    Department of Psychology, Brain and Cognition, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Journal of Vision September 2016, Vol.16, 501. doi:10.1167/16.12.501
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      Noor Seijdel, Kandan Ramakrishnan, Max Losch, Steven Scholte; Overlap in performance of CNN's, human behavior and EEG classification. Journal of Vision 2016;16(12):501. doi: 10.1167/16.12.501.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Convolutional neural networks (CNNs) have begun to rival human performance in terms of identifying classes of images from specific datasets. The CNN architecture roughly mimics the hierarchical visual processing of the ventral stream and these CNNs have been used successfully to explain a significant portion of neural responses in the human ventral cortex. We compared performance on an animal/non-animal categorization task based on 1) human behavior, 2) CNN scores, and 3) classification using EEG measurements. Images differed in their complexity, as indexed by their Spatial Coherence (SC) and Contrast Energy (CE) and were unknown to both the network and the human observers. Our results show a remarkable overlap in the behavior of the CNN, EEG classification and human behavior. All three perform best for images with a medium complexity and worst for images with a high complexity. Importantly, inspecting the type of errors, we observe that for images with a low and medium complexity by far most mistakes are made on trials in which an animal is present and the CNN, humans and EEG classifier fail to pick this up. For complex images the proportion of false alarms and misses are much more comparable. Looking at the results from the EEG classifier, we further observe that the classification reliability of animal vs. non-animal peaks between 300 and 400 ms. These results indicate that the object recognition process of both human (behavior and EEG) and CNN is influenced by the complexity of an image. This overlap strengthens the idea that CNNs are accurate models for human visual perception.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2016

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