August 2016
Volume 16, Issue 12
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Effects of adaptation on orientation tuning in excitatory and inhibitory neurons in macaque V1 and V2
Author Affiliations
  • Daniel Thengone
    Brain and Mind Research Institute, Weill Cornell Graduate School of Medical Sciences
  • Yunguo Yu
    Brain and Mind Research Institute, Weill Cornell Graduate School of Medical Sciences
  • Jonathan Victor
    Brain and Mind Research Institute, Weill Cornell Graduate School of Medical Sciences
Journal of Vision September 2016, Vol.16, 538. doi:10.1167/16.12.538
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Daniel Thengone, Yunguo Yu, Jonathan Victor; Effects of adaptation on orientation tuning in excitatory and inhibitory neurons in macaque V1 and V2 . Journal of Vision 2016;16(12):538. doi: 10.1167/16.12.538.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Adaptation modifies sensory pathways to adjust to the characteristics of the recently-encountered visual world. However, even for neuronal properties as fundamental as orientation, much is unknown about adaptation-induced alterations in tuning. To delineate the influence of adaptation on neural and network properties, we investigated its effect in functionally distinct cell categories (excitatory vs inhibitory) in two hierarchically-related brain regions, V1 and V2, of the primate visual pathway. We performed multitetrode recordings from 90 neurons in V1 and V2 of 6 macaques using drifting sinusoidal gratings, after adaptation to a preferred and a non-preferred orientation for brief (0.4 s) and prolonged (40 s) exposures. We found a wide range of tuning changes induced by adaptation. In layer 2/3, orientation selectivity either increased or decreased, and the tuning curve peak moved either towards (attractive) or away from (repulsive) the adapter. In contrast, Layer 4 neurons typically broadened their tuning after brief adaptation and narrowed their tuning after prolonged adaptation. In V1, findings were similar for inhibitory and excitatory neurons (as distinguished by their extracellular action potential shape). However, in V2, prolonged adaptation broadened the tuning of inhibitory cells, but narrowed the tuning of excitatory cells. Thus, there is a wide variety of tuning changes induced by adaptation in both V1 and V2, and dynamics of adaptation are distinct in excitatory and inhibitory neurons within V2. Notably, these findings have implications for the circuit mechanisms of orientation selectivity: attractive shifts do not occur in purely feedforward models, or in recurrent models in which inhibitory neurons are untuned. In sum, tuned inhibitory neurons contribute not only to orientation tuning, but also to how this tuning adapts – and hence, play a critical role in the neural representations that ultimately influence perception

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2016

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×