August 2016
Volume 16, Issue 12
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Visual cues from augmented reality glasses to improve gait of Parkinson's disease patients
Author Affiliations
  • Richard van Wezel
    Biophysics, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University, Nijmegen
  • Ciska Heida
    Biomedical Signals and Systems, MIRA, University of Twente
  • Jorik Nonnekes
    Biomedical Signals and Systems, MIRA, University of Twente
  • Yan Zhao
    Biomedical Signals and Systems, MIRA, University of Twente
Journal of Vision September 2016, Vol.16, 770. doi:10.1167/16.12.770
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      Richard van Wezel, Ciska Heida, Jorik Nonnekes, Yan Zhao; Visual cues from augmented reality glasses to improve gait of Parkinson's disease patients . Journal of Vision 2016;16(12):770. doi: 10.1167/16.12.770.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

External cueing with rhythmic auditory stimuli or patterned visual stimuli reduces freezing of gait and improves the quality of gait in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). We investigated whether augmented reality glasses can be used to provide these cues and improve locomotion for these patients in a laboratory setting using activities of daily living. We delivered rhythmic visual and auditory cues with the Google glass, such as flashing lights, moving patterns and sounds. Subjects were instructed to navigate different walking paths of varying complexity that included wide and narrow turns and the entrance of a door. The patients were fitted with inertial sensors in a motion capture suit on their body to quantitatively analyze their walking pattern. Two independent raters scored freezing of gait based on videos. The results show that with cues gait patterns normalize and freezing of gait reduces, especially during complicated movements (e.g. full turns, doorways). We conclude that visual/auditory augmented reality cues by smart glasses are a promising tool to reduce freezing of gait and improve the walking patterns of PD patients.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2016

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