August 2016
Volume 16, Issue 12
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Haptic-visual solid shape matching with variable numbers of fingers
Author Affiliations
  • J. Farley Norman
    Psychological Sciences Department, Ogden College of Science and Engineering, Western Kentucky University
  • Olivia Adkins
    Psychological Sciences Department, Ogden College of Science and Engineering, Western Kentucky University
  • Catherine Dowell
    Psychological Sciences Department, Ogden College of Science and Engineering, Western Kentucky University
  • Stevie Hoyng
    Psychological Sciences Department, Ogden College of Science and Engineering, Western Kentucky University
  • Ashley Gilliam
    Psychological Sciences Department, Ogden College of Science and Engineering, Western Kentucky University
  • Lauren Pedersen
    Psychological Sciences Department, Ogden College of Science and Engineering, Western Kentucky University
Journal of Vision September 2016, Vol.16, 780. doi:10.1167/16.12.780
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      J. Farley Norman, Olivia Adkins, Catherine Dowell, Stevie Hoyng, Ashley Gilliam, Lauren Pedersen; Haptic-visual solid shape matching with variable numbers of fingers. Journal of Vision 2016;16(12):780. doi: 10.1167/16.12.780.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Thirty-six younger and older adults participated in a cross-modal shape matching task. On any given trial, a participant haptically explored, but could not see, a plastic copy of a bell pepper (Capsicum annuum) for seven seconds; the participant then chose which of 12 simultaneously visible bell peppers possessed the same 3-D shape. Some participants explored the object shapes using only one finger (the index finger), while others used either three or five fingers. Interestingly, there was no effect of the number of fingers upon the participants' shape-matching performance. There was, however, a strong effect of age: the younger adults' performance was 48.6 percent higher than that of the older adults (F(1, 30) = 15.7, p < .001, partial eta-squared = .34). These results (i.e., no effect of the number of fingers) differ from those of Jansson and Monaci (2004, 2006) who found a large difference in performance between the use of one and three fingers for recognizing mostly manmade objects. When perceiving naturally-shaped objects, it appears that one finger is all that is required for accurate haptic-visual shape matching performance.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2016

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