August 2016
Volume 16, Issue 12
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Determination of the slope of the psychometric function for different stereoacuity tasks
Author Affiliations
  • Ignacio Serrano-Pedraza
    Faculty of Psychology, Complutense University of Madrid, 28223, Spain
  • Kathleen Vancleef
    Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, NE2 4HH, UK
  • Will Herbert
    Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, NE2 4HH, UK
  • Maeve Woodhouse
    Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, NE2 4HH, UK
  • Jenny Read
    Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, NE2 4HH, UK
Journal of Vision September 2016, Vol.16, 838. doi:10.1167/16.12.838
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      Ignacio Serrano-Pedraza, Kathleen Vancleef, Will Herbert, Maeve Woodhouse, Jenny Read; Determination of the slope of the psychometric function for different stereoacuity tasks . Journal of Vision 2016;16(12):838. doi: 10.1167/16.12.838.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Adaptive Bayesian procedures are widely used in psychophysics to estimate detection thresholds. Simulations have revealed the importance of the parameters selected for the model likelihood function in obtaining threshold estimates with small bias and standard error (AlcalĂĄ-Quintana & GarcNĂșcleoa-Perez, 2004). One recommendation is that the spread (sigma) of the model function has to be bigger than the real sigma of the psychometric function of the subject. The selection of a smaller sigma can introduce a bias in the threshold estimation and increase the standard errors. Here we wanted to estimate the value of sigma and find whether it changes with participant's age using three different stereoacuity tasks. Studies were performed using a stereo display with polarized glasses. In all studies we used an adaptive weighted one-up one-down staircase procedure with 80-120 trials and a logistic psychometric function was fitted to the probabilities of correct detection in order to estimate stereoacuity thresholds and sigma. In the first study, we used a spatial two-alternative forced-choice (2AFC) task for detecting a 3D square created by introducing horizontal disparities in dynamic random dots. In the second study we used the same stimuli but in a spatial 4AFC task. In the third study we used 4AFC too but using a computerized version of the clinical Randot stereoacuity test. In the first study we tested a population of 70 people (aged 4.6-61 years, mean 20 years). Results showed that sigma (mean=1.23,SD=0.88) was independent of age (r=-0.01, p=0.92) although it correlates with stereoacuity (r=0.26, p=0.02; sigma increases by 1.23 for every doubling in threshold). The second and third studies were performed with younger populations (4.74-21.8 years, mean 10.3 years) but results were similar; again sigma did not correlate with age. Therefore, to estimate stereoacuity thresholds with adaptive Bayesian-staircases we recommend using sigma = 1.8 independently of age.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2016

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