August 2016
Volume 16, Issue 12
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Opposed effects of high- vs. low-frequency transcranial random noise stimulation on visual motion adaptation
Author Affiliations
  • Gianluca Campana
    Department of General Psychology, University of Padova, Italy
  • Rebecca Camilleri
    Department of General Psychology, University of Padova, Italy
  • Beatrice Moret
    Department of General Psychology, University of Padova, Italy
  • Andrea Pavan
    School of Psychology, University of Lincoln, UK
Journal of Vision September 2016, Vol.16, 1187. doi:10.1167/16.12.1187
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      Gianluca Campana, Rebecca Camilleri, Beatrice Moret, Andrea Pavan; Opposed effects of high- vs. low-frequency transcranial random noise stimulation on visual motion adaptation . Journal of Vision 2016;16(12):1187. doi: 10.1167/16.12.1187.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) is a recent neuro-modulation technique whose effects at both behavioural and neural level are still debated. Here we exploited the well-known phenomenon of motion aftereffect (MAE) in order to investigate the effects of high- vs. low-frequency tRNS on motion adaptation and recovery. Participants were asked to evaluate MAE duration following the exposure of a circular rotating and expanding grating for 30 s, while being stimulated with either sham or tRNS across different blocks. Different groups were administered with either high- or low-frequency tRNS. Stimulation sites were either bilateral hMT+, early visual areas or frontal areas. Results showed that, whereas no effects on MAE duration were produced by stimulation of early visual areas or frontal areas, high-frequency tRNS caused a significant decrease in MAE duration whereas low-frequency tRNS caused a significant corresponding increase in MAE duration. These data indicate that high- vs. low-frequency tRNS has opposed effects on the unbalance, created by adaptation, between neurons tuned to opposite motion directions, and thus on neuronal excitability

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2016

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