August 2016
Volume 16, Issue 12
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Early experience alters the developmental trajectory of visual, auditory and tactile sound-shape correspondences
Author Affiliations
  • Hiu Mei Chow
    Psychology Department, College of Liberal Arts, University of Massachusetts Bboston
  • Daniel Harris
    Psychology Department, College of Liberal Arts, University of Massachusetts Bboston
  • Sandy Eid
    Psychology Department, College of Liberal Arts, University of Massachusetts Bboston
  • Vivian Ciaramitaro
    Psychology Department, College of Liberal Arts, University of Massachusetts Bboston
Journal of Vision September 2016, Vol.16, 1193. doi:10.1167/16.12.1193
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Hiu Mei Chow, Daniel Harris, Sandy Eid, Vivian Ciaramitaro; Early experience alters the developmental trajectory of visual, auditory and tactile sound-shape correspondences. Journal of Vision 2016;16(12):1193. doi: 10.1167/16.12.1193.

      Download citation file:


      © 2017 Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology.

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Crossmodal correspondence, the association of information across the senses, is an ubiquitous multisensory phenomenon. The bouba/kiki effect, a prime example, finds an association between an abstract shape, spikey or round, and a nonsense word, /kiki/ or /baba/, respectively. This effect is found across cultures and languages, early in development, and is manifest in different senses (see Spence, 2011, for a review). Little is known of how development and experience alter this correspondence. Here we examine if the association strength of the bouba/kiki effect is modulated by age and experience. Over 400 participants, 3-80 years old, were recruited from the Museum of Science Boston. Participants chose (1) which of two visual shapes best matched a given non-sense word (Experiment1: sound-to-visual-shape), (2) which of two sounds best matched a given visual shape (Experiment2: visual-shape-to-sound), or (3) which of two felt shapes, hidden-from-view, best matched a given non-sense word (Experiment3: sound-to-tactile-shape). We quantified association strength by measuring the proportion of trials a round attribute (e.g. round visual/tactile shape or an /a/ sound) was chosen for each stimulus type over multiple repeats of each stimulus combination. We found that association strength increased during early and middle childhood, plateaued before adulthood, and declined in older adulthood. Across experiments, association strength was modulated by musical and language experience, with a trend of enhanced association strength in musicians and monolingual participants and as a function of time on task. Our findings, using the same paradigm and stimuli across a wide age range, suggest crossmodal correspondences are dynamic and malleable to environmental exposure.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2016

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×