August 2016
Volume 16, Issue 12
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
On the importance of inter-sensory redundancy: Learning a new rhythmic coordination pattern using one mode (vision vs kinesthesis) can teach performance using the other mode
Author Affiliations
  • Geoffrey Bingham
    Psychological and Brain Sciences, Indiana University
  • Winona Snapp-Childs
    Psychological and Brain Sciences, Indiana University
  • Qin Zhu
    Kinesiology and Health, University of Wyoming
  • Shaochen Huang
    Kinesiology and Health, University of Wyoming
Journal of Vision September 2016, Vol.16, 1194. doi:10.1167/16.12.1194
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      Geoffrey Bingham, Winona Snapp-Childs, Qin Zhu, Shaochen Huang; On the importance of inter-sensory redundancy: Learning a new rhythmic coordination pattern using one mode (vision vs kinesthesis) can teach performance using the other mode . Journal of Vision 2016;16(12):1194. doi: 10.1167/16.12.1194.

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      © 2017 Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology.

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Abstract

Introduction: Many studies have shown that rhythmic movement coordination entails use of perception to couple the movements. Different sensory modalities can be used (e.g. vision versus kinesthesis). However, it is unknown whether learning via one modality allows one to perform the learned coordination using another modality, and if so, whether this is immediate (amodal information) or requires time to allow one modality to train another. Methods: To examine this issue, we trained two groups of participants (10Ss each) to produce 90° rhythmic coordination either visually (unimanual) or kinesthetically (bimanual), then tested whether the learning transferred to performance with the other modality, either immediately or after practice producing 90° with inter-sensory redundancy (i.e. with both visual and kinesthetic information available). Results: Both groups: 1) learned 90° similarly; 2) showed little immediate transfer to the untrained single modality condition; 3) were able to use the redundancy condition to train the untrained modality. Adding the untrained modality in the inter-sensory redundancy condition impaired learned performance more for the visually trained group. Conclusion: The results show that learning to detect and use relevant information in one modality does not allow one to be able to immediately detect and use the information in another modality. Nevertheless, one modality can teach another when cross training is allowed.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2016

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