August 2016
Volume 16, Issue 12
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Higher N1 responses in relatives of schizophrenia patients than controls in visual backward masking
Author Affiliations
  • Janir da Cruz
    Laboratory of Psychophysics, Brain Mind Institute, Swiss Institute of Technology (EPFL), Switzerland
  • Maya Roinishvili
    Vision Research Laboratory, Beritashvili Centre of Experimental Biomedicine, Tbilisi, Georgia
  • Eka Chkonia
    Institute of Cognitive Neurosciences, Agricultural University of Georgia, Tbilisi, Georgia
  • Patricia Figueiredo
    Institute for Systems and Robotics/Department of Bioengineering, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal
  • Michael Herzog
    Laboratory of Psychophysics, Brain Mind Institute, Swiss Institute of Technology (EPFL), Switzerland
Journal of Vision September 2016, Vol.16, 1223. doi:10.1167/16.12.1223
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Janir da Cruz, Maya Roinishvili, Eka Chkonia, Patricia Figueiredo, Michael Herzog; Higher N1 responses in relatives of schizophrenia patients than controls in visual backward masking . Journal of Vision 2016;16(12):1223. doi: 10.1167/16.12.1223.

      Download citation file:


      © 2017 Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology.

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Schizophrenia is a heterogeneous disease. To cope with this heterogeneity, we tested a large sample of schizophrenia patients (n = 80), non-affected first-degree relatives (n = 56) and matched healthy controls (n = 52), in a visual backward masking (VBM) paradigm while recording the EEG. In VBM, a target stimulus is followed by a mask, which decreases performance on the target. We had three conditions: target only and two VBM conditions, with long and short inter-stimulus interval (ISI). Patients' performance was impaired, while the relatives performed at the same level as the controls. Performance was significantly correlated with the EEG N1 amplitude, as measured by the Global Field Power (GFP). Most interestingly, N1 amplitudes were higher in relatives compared to controls, while they were lower in patients relative to controls as previously reported. For relatives, N1 amplitudes were at the same level in all conditions; however, for controls and patients, N1 amplitudes increased with task difficult, e.g., amplitudes in the long ISI condition were lower than in short ISI condition. Our results suggest that relatives use a compensation mechanism tuning the brain to maximum performance in all conditions. Since relatives are already at the peak of their activations, increasing the task difficulty does not change brain processing.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2016

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×