August 2016
Volume 16, Issue 12
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Gray matter differences are associated with non-identity face perception in developmental prosopagnosia
Author Affiliations
  • Jiahui Guo
    Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Dartmouth College
  • Hua Yang
    Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Dartmouth College
  • Constantin Rezlescu
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University
  • Tirta Susilo
    School of Psychology, Victoria University of Wellington
  • Bradley Duchaine
    Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Dartmouth College
Journal of Vision September 2016, Vol.16, 1250. doi:10.1167/16.12.1250
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      Jiahui Guo, Hua Yang, Constantin Rezlescu, Tirta Susilo, Bradley Duchaine; Gray matter differences are associated with non-identity face perception in developmental prosopagnosia. Journal of Vision 2016;16(12):1250. doi: 10.1167/16.12.1250.

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      © 2017 Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology.

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Abstract

People with developmental prosopagnosia (DP) show considerable behavioral and neural heterogeneity, but no links between behavioral and neural measures within DP have been reported. Similar to previous reports, comparison between 18 DPs and 18 controls showed DPs had reduced gray matter intensity in temporal cortex. In addition, DPs had reductions in bilateral inferior frontal cortex, bilateral amygdala, left lateral inferior occipital cortex, and right hippocampus. To examine behavioral differences within the DPs, we assessed their perception of identity, sex, age, race, anger, trustworthiness, eye position, and head viewpoint with sorting tasks. Cluster analysis of these results suggested the DPs could be divided into a group that had normal perception of sex, age, race, anger, and trustworthiness (Type I) and another with impaired perception of these aspects (Type II). Compared with Type II DPs (n = 7), Type I DPs (n = 10) had reduced gray matter intensity in the vicinity of inferior frontal gyrus bilaterally and right lateral inferior occipital cortex and increased gray matter intensity around bilateral hippocampus (uncorrected). Because of the difficulty of establishing a clear division between different types, we computed a perception index for each DP based on the five CFPT tests that differed between Type I and Type II DPs. A multiple regression analysis with the perception index and gray matter intensity found results consistent with our comparison between the two types of DP, with positive correlations for inferior frontal gyrus bilaterally and right lateral inferior occipital cortex, as well as negative correlations for hippocampus bilaterally. In summary, our results indicated that DPs have reduced gray matter in temporal lobe and other areas. In addition, several areas within the DP group showed an association between gray matter and non-identity face perception.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2016

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