August 2016
Volume 16, Issue 12
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Attention-related BOLD modulation with and without superior colliculus inactivation
Author Affiliations
  • Anil Bollimunta
    Laboratory of Sensorimotor Research, National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health
  • Amarender Bogadhi
    Laboratory of Sensorimotor Research, National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health
  • David Leopold
    Laboratory of Neuropsychology, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health
  • Richard Krauzlis
    Laboratory of Sensorimotor Research, National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health
Journal of Vision September 2016, Vol.16, 1305. doi:10.1167/16.12.1305
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Anil Bollimunta, Amarender Bogadhi, David Leopold, Richard Krauzlis; Attention-related BOLD modulation with and without superior colliculus inactivation. Journal of Vision 2016;16(12):1305. doi: 10.1167/16.12.1305.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

The superior colliculus (SC) contributes to visual spatial attention through mechanisms that can be dissociated from the classic attention-related modulation in visual cortex (Zenon & Krauzlis, 2012). To identify brain regions that might be part of the SC attention network, we have conducted fMRI in a monkey performing a spatial attention task, with and without SC inactivation. Imaging runs contained three types of blocks: Baseline (B), Foveal Attention (FA) and Peripheral Attention (PA), indicated to the monkey by the color of the fixation spot. In B block trials, the relevant stimulus was a central fixation point that dimmed at randomized times. FA block trials were similar to B block trials but added a peripheral motion-change stimulus as an irrelevant distracter. In PA block trials, the fixation point did not dim and the peripheral motion-change was the relevant stimulus. The monkey's task, in each block, was to maintain central fixation and to report the relevant stimulus change by releasing a lever to get a juice reward. In each anatomically defined ROI, we identified voxels with significant differences between PA and B blocks, and calculated an attention modulation index (AMI) for each of these voxels based on the %change in BOLD for PA and FA blocks. During SC inactivation, several cortical areas (V1, MT/MST, LIP and FEF) showed significant attentional modulation, with computed AMIs comparable to control values, despite the presence of significant performance deficits in the attention task. However, attention-related modulation was abolished in cortical area FST in the superior temporal sulcus, and dramatically reduced in the caudate, a subcortical input nucleus for the basal ganglia. The results suggest that the SC contributes to attention through a circuit involving cortical area FST and parts of the basal ganglia, highlighting the possible role of subcortical decision-making mechanisms in the control of attention.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2016

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×