August 2016
Volume 16, Issue 12
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
The Role of Amodal Object-based Attention in Retaining Bindings in Working Memory
Author Affiliations
  • Fan Wu
    Department of Psychology and Behavioral Sciences, Zhejiang University
  • Hong Ma
    Department of Psychology and Behavioral Sciences, Zhejiang University
  • Kaifeng He
    Department of Psychology and Behavioral Sciences, Zhejiang University
  • Yue Yang
    Department of Psychology and Behavioral Sciences, Zhejiang University
  • Zaifeng Gao
    Department of Psychology and Behavioral Sciences, Zhejiang University
  • Mowei Shen
    Department of Psychology and Behavioral Sciences, Zhejiang University
Journal of Vision September 2016, Vol.16, 1436. doi:10.1167/16.12.1436
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      Fan Wu, Hong Ma, Kaifeng He, Yue Yang, Zaifeng Gao, Mowei Shen; The Role of Amodal Object-based Attention in Retaining Bindings in Working Memory . Journal of Vision 2016;16(12):1436. doi: 10.1167/16.12.1436.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Over the past decade, it has been debated whether retaining bindings in working memory requires more attention than retaining constituent features, focusing on domain-general attention and space-based attention. In the current study we hypothesized that retaining bindings in working memory needs more amodal object-based attention than retaining single features. In a change detection task, we tested three typical bindings, which had been suggested requiring no more attention than the constituent features: The two constituent features of binding were stored in different working memory modules (cross-module binding, Experiment 1), from auditory and visual modalities (cross-modal binding, Experiment 2), or spatially separated (cross-space visual binding, Experiments 3 and 4). In the critical condition, we added a secondary object feature-report task during the delay interval of the change-detection task, such that the secondary task competed for object-based attention with the to-be-memorized stimuli. Moreover, the secondary task was presented in either visual (Experiments 1-3) or auditory (Experiment 4) modality. If more amodal object-based attention is required for retaining bindings than for retaining constituent features in working memory, the attention-demanding secondary task should impair the binding performance to a larger degree relative to the performance of constituent features. In congruent with this prediction, Experiments 1–4 consistently revealed a significantly larger impairment for bindings than for the constituent features, regardless of the modality of the secondary task.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2016

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