June 2017
Volume 17, Issue 7
Open Access
OSA Fall Vision Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Recording fixational eye movements with a new AOSLO: simulation, measurement and evaluation
Author Affiliations
  • Laura K. Young
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
    Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham, UK.
  • Anna K. Hauperich
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
  • Timothy J. Morris
    Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham, UK.
  • Christopher D. Saunter
    Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham, UK.
  • Hannah E. Smithson
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
Journal of Vision June 2017, Vol.17, 34. doi:10.1167/17.7.34
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      Laura K. Young, Anna K. Hauperich, Timothy J. Morris, Christopher D. Saunter, Hannah E. Smithson; Recording fixational eye movements with a new AOSLO: simulation, measurement and evaluation. Journal of Vision 2017;17(7):34. doi: 10.1167/17.7.34.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO) produces high-resolution images of the retinal mosaic. These images contain distortions due to eye motion, which can be used for high speed and resolution eye tracking that is referenced to the photoreceptor mosaic. Patch-based registration methods employ either a) cross-correlation or b) a map-seeking circuit. Both techniques compare images to a reference frame, which may itself contain motion and so provides only a relative measure. We have developed a method for generating motion-free reference frames and use it to compare techniques a) and b) to a modified method using feature (cone) tracking. We present a comparison of these algorithms under variations in image quality, retinal structure and types of eye movement. We discuss the implications for psychophysical experiments, which require accurate measurement of eye movements and cone density/arrangement, as well as for clinical experiments, in which sub-optimal image quality can affect such measures.

Meeting abstract presented at the 2016 OSA Fall Vision Meeting

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