September 2017
Volume 17, Issue 10
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2017
Double training reduces motor response specificity
Author Affiliations
  • Lukasz Grzeczkowski
    Laboratory of Psychophysics, Brain Mind Institute, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL)
    Department of Psychology, Ludwig-Maximilian University of Munich
  • Aline Cretenoud
    Laboratory of Psychophysics, Brain Mind Institute, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL)
  • Fred Mast
    Institute of Psychology, University of Bern
  • Michael Herzog
    Laboratory of Psychophysics, Brain Mind Institute, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL)
Journal of Vision August 2017, Vol.17, 38. doi:10.1167/17.10.38
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Lukasz Grzeczkowski, Aline Cretenoud, Fred Mast, Michael Herzog; Double training reduces motor response specificity. Journal of Vision 2017;17(10):38. doi: 10.1167/17.10.38.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

The hallmark of perceptual learning is its specificity. Recently, we trained observers with a classical three-line bisection task where observers responded by button presses whether the central line is offset to the left or right. Performance improved. However, there was no transfer to the same bisection task when observers adjusted the central line with the computer mouse. Likewise, adjustment training did not transfer to the button press condition. Here, we first show that training is even specific when the trained hand is used for both motor responses. However, there is transfer from the trained to the untrained hand. Most importantly, we show that a double training protocol enables strong transfer from the mouse adjustment condition to the button presses condition but not the other way around. In each training session, observers trained blockwise with either a vertical bisection stimulus and adjusted the central line with the computer mouse or they trained with a horizontal bisection stimulus and responded by button presses. Before and after training, we tested performance with the vertical bisection stimulus where observers responded by button presses. Surprisingly, training led to transfer in this condition. Without the double training, there was no such transfer. We propose that stimuli are coded together with their corresponding actions when both are linked through extensive learning.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2017

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×