September 2017
Volume 17, Issue 10
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2017
Dissociable biases in orientation recall: The oblique effect follows retinal coordinates, while repulsion from cardinal follows real-world coordinates.
Author Affiliations
  • Rosanne Rademaker
    Psychology Department, University of California San Diego, San Diego, USA
  • Chaipat Chunharas
    Psychology Department, University of California San Diego, San Diego, USA
  • Pascal Mamassian
    Laboratoire des Systèmes Perceptifs, Ecole Normale Supérieure, Paris, France
  • John Serences
    Psychology Department, University of California San Diego, San Diego, USA
Journal of Vision August 2017, Vol.17, 107. doi:10.1167/17.10.107
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Rosanne Rademaker, Chaipat Chunharas, Pascal Mamassian, John Serences; Dissociable biases in orientation recall: The oblique effect follows retinal coordinates, while repulsion from cardinal follows real-world coordinates.. Journal of Vision 2017;17(10):107. doi: 10.1167/17.10.107.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Systematic biases emerge when people report an orientation from memory after a brief delay. One such bias is the classic oblique effect, with smaller replication errors for targets presented at cardinal compared to oblique orientations. A second known bias is a repulsion away from the cardinal axes, with responses to targets near vertical and horizontal exaggerated to lie even further away from those axes. Here we wanted to test the origins of these biases. Twelve participants were presented with randomly oriented gratings (between 1–180º in 3º steps) on each trial for 100 ms. After a 1.5 s delay period a response probe appeared and participants replicated the target orientation using the mouse. Critically, on half of the trials a rotating chinrest tilted the head of participants 45º from upright – with tilt direction counterbalanced across participants. Participants switched between upright and tilted head positions every 60 trials, and 1800 trials per tilt position were collected over the course of several days. Data show that the classic oblique effect is tied to a retinal coordinate frame, with better resolution for targets presented at orientations that are cardinal relative to the head, irrespective of its tilt. However, the repulsion from cardinal remained tied to real world vertical and horizontal. We hypothesize that while the classical oblique effect is driven by retinal and cortical factors determined during visual development (such as the over-representation of cardinal orientations in visual cortex), the second 'repulsion' bias is due to a higher-level decisional component whereby representations are cropped relative to real-world cardinal coordinates.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2017

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×