September 2017
Volume 17, Issue 10
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2017
Visual Discomfort and Ethnicity
Author Affiliations
  • Robert Mosher
    Vision Sciences, College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, California State University Northridge
  • Daniel Del Cid
    Vision Sciences, College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, California State University Northridge
  • Arthur Ilnicki
    Vision Sciences, College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, California State University Northridge
  • Stefanie Drew
    Vision Sciences, College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, California State University Northridge
Journal of Vision August 2017, Vol.17, 157. doi:10.1167/17.10.157
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      Robert Mosher, Daniel Del Cid, Arthur Ilnicki, Stefanie Drew; Visual Discomfort and Ethnicity. Journal of Vision 2017;17(10):157. doi: 10.1167/17.10.157.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Ethnic differences in prevalence of visual impairment have been reported in children but this distinction has been less studied in college age adults (Kleinstein, 2003). Other research suggests an overall 16.8% prevalence of myopia in the Latino population (Tarczy-Hornoch, 2006). We previously noted a high incidence of visual discomfort symptoms reported by a diverse population of college students. These findings were expected, as symptoms including ocular fatigue, perceptual distortions, and headaches are linked to nearwork tasks commonly performed by students, such as reading or viewing computer screens. Based on ethnic-specific prevalence of myopia noted by other studies we investigated whether similar patterns might be observed in reports of visual discomfort symptoms in college students. Methods: Two validated surveys for assessing visual discomfort symptoms, the Visual Discomfort Survey (VDS) (Conlon et al., 1999) and the Convergence Insufficiency Symptoms Survey (CISS) (Borsting et al., 2003), and demographic questions were administered to 451 college students. Results: Participants who identified as Latino/a or Hispanic showed significantly different patterns of results in a mediation model than those that identified as Non-Latio/a or Non-Hispanic. These findings suggest prevalence of visual discomfort in the college population may be confounded by ethnic differences.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2017

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