September 2017
Volume 17, Issue 10
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2017
Distortions of spatial memory: Social attention, but not social interaction effects
Author Affiliations
  • Tim Vestner
    Department of Psychology, University of York
  • Steven Tipper
    Department of Psychology, University of York
  • Tom Hartley
    Department of Psychology, University of York
  • Shirley-Ann Rueschemeyer
    Department of Psychology, University of York
Journal of Vision August 2017, Vol.17, 354. doi:10.1167/17.10.354
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Tim Vestner, Steven Tipper, Tom Hartley, Shirley-Ann Rueschemeyer; Distortions of spatial memory: Social attention, but not social interaction effects. Journal of Vision 2017;17(10):354. doi: 10.1167/17.10.354.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Recent studies have demonstrated the malleability of distance perception in affective/social situations, claiming that distance perception is inherently tied to social experience. Importantly, only an egocentric perspective, involving distances between the observer and a target stimulus, was studied. The present series of experiments investigated whether similar distortions of space also hold true for allocentric conditions. Using a variety of displays presenting individuals in different spatial configurations and various relationships to each other, it was tested whether an observer recalled the distance between individuals as smaller or larger depending on their relationship and level of engagement. Distance-altering effects resulting from the attention-direction of the individuals were found. However, thus far there is no evidence for the influence of the social relationships of the agents on the recall of their distance to each other. These results confirm previous research on attention cueing but are not in agreement with theories proposing social top-down effects on spatial memory.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2017

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×