September 2017
Volume 17, Issue 10
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2017
Short-term patching does not affect interocular correlation sensitivity
Author Affiliations
  • Jacob Sheynin
    McGill Vision Research, McGill, Dept. Ophthalmology, McGill University, PQ, Canada
  • Alexandre Reynaud
    McGill Vision Research, McGill, Dept. Ophthalmology, McGill University, PQ, Canada
  • Robert Hess
    McGill Vision Research, McGill, Dept. Ophthalmology, McGill University, PQ, Canada
Journal of Vision August 2017, Vol.17, 497. doi:10.1167/17.10.497
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      Jacob Sheynin, Alexandre Reynaud, Robert Hess; Short-term patching does not affect interocular correlation sensitivity. Journal of Vision 2017;17(10):497. doi: 10.1167/17.10.497.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Binocular vision and subsequently global stereopsis results from the integration of two similar but not identical retinal images. As such, sensitivity to interocular correlation is a necessary precursor to global stereopsis. Short-term (150 mins) monocular deprivation has been shown to both enhance the contribution of the occluded eye to binocular combination and to improving stereoacuity (Ng and Farrell, 2016). In the present study, we adapted the quick Contrast Sensitivity Function (qCSF, Lesmes et al., 2010) to the quick Correlation Sensitivity Function (qCorrSF) to examine the effect of patching on the discrimination of interocular correlation. The stimuli used to measure interocular correlation consisted of two dichoptic noise patterns modulated by a sinusoidal oblique envelope of correlation structure (45° or 135° degrees). At the peak of the sinusoid, the two patterns were maximally correlated and at the trough they were minimally correlated. We compared subjects' baseline qCorrSF to their performance after 150 minutes of monocular deprivation with a diffuser eye-patch, and took an additional measure at 30 minutes after patching. Our study took place over the course of three separate days. Across these sessions, we counterbalanced the order in which we either patched subjects' dominant or non-dominant eye, or conducted a control session where no eye was patched. Our preliminary results have not indicated a consistent effect of patching on subjects' correlation sensitivity function. While patching has been shown to improve stereoacuity, our results indicate that this effect may not be attributed to an enhanced sensitivity to interocular correlation. Acknowledgements ERA-NET NEURON Grant (JTC 2015) to RFH

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2017

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