September 2017
Volume 17, Issue 10
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2017
Eye Movements During Rapid Naming tasks Predict Reading Ability.
Author Affiliations
  • Sheila Crewther
    Dept of Psychology, School of Psychology & Public Health
  • Jessica Peters
    Dept of Psychology, School of Psychology & Public Health
  • Nahal Goharpey
    Dept of Psychology, School of Psychology & Public Health
  • Jessica Taylor
    Dept of Psychology, School of Psychology & Public Health
  • Chantanee Mungkhetklang
    Dept of Psychology, School of Psychology & Public Health
  • Daniel Crewther
    Dept of Psychology, School of Psychology & Public Health
  • Robin Laycock
    Dept of Psychology, School of Psychology & Public Health
    Discipline of Psycholgy, School of Health & Biomedical Sciences
Journal of Vision August 2017, Vol.17, 539. doi:10.1167/17.10.539
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      Sheila Crewther, Jessica Peters, Nahal Goharpey, Jessica Taylor, Chantanee Mungkhetklang, Daniel Crewther, Robin Laycock; Eye Movements During Rapid Naming tasks Predict Reading Ability.. Journal of Vision 2017;17(10):539. doi: 10.1167/17.10.539.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Rapid Automatized Naming (RAN) has long been known to identify poor/dyslexic readers. The mechanism underpinning RAN are often associated with phonological processing so we set out to determine to what extent eye movements contribute to RAN and text reading ability. Thirty typical readers and 18 poor readers (M age = 7.15), were assessed for phonological awareness, reading, and RAN. RAN was assessed while eye movements were being recorded. Poor/dyslexic readers demonstrated significantly longer fixation durations and more fixations per correctly named stimulus (defined as fixation efficiency). Fixation duration and fixation efficiency together were significant predictors of RAN (89%), reading accuracy (27%), reading comprehension (24%), and reading rate (33%), after controlling for phonological awareness and nonverbal intelligence (which together contributed 4%, 19%, 12%, and 2% respectively). Our results suggest that RAN is more closely related to fixation function than phonological skill and argue against the view that RAN is simply a measure of phonological processing. Rather, RAN should be conceptualised as a surrogate of the reading process including organized, sequential eye movements and selective shifts of attention, via accurate saccades and fixations between familiar objects of interest, requiring rapid icon identification and access to the lexicon for naming.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2017

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