September 2017
Volume 17, Issue 10
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2017
Transcranial electric stimulation (tES) to early visual areas alters large-scale functional connectivity.
Author Affiliations
  • Shuhei Shima
    Department of Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo.
  • Kristina Visscher
    Department of Neurobiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham.
  • Joseph Griffis
    Department of Psychology, University of Alabama at Birmingham.
  • Aaron Seitz
    Department of Psychology, University of California Riverside.
  • Yuko Yotsumoto
    Department of Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo.
Journal of Vision August 2017, Vol.17, 588. doi:10.1167/17.10.588
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Shuhei Shima, Kristina Visscher, Joseph Griffis, Aaron Seitz, Yuko Yotsumoto; Transcranial electric stimulation (tES) to early visual areas alters large-scale functional connectivity.. Journal of Vision 2017;17(10):588. doi: 10.1167/17.10.588.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Visual areas are functionally connected with higher cortical areas, and these connections with large-scale brain networks are known to shape visual perception. Recent research suggests that transcranial electric stimulation (tES) can induce changes in brain activity. To better understand how tES influences visual processing networks, we examined how tES modulated the connectivity of early visual areas both during and after stimulation. Ten participants took part in five fMRI sessions conducted on five different days, during which they received different stimulation protocols: transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), 10 Hz transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS), high-frequency transcranial random noise stimulation (hf-tRNS), low-frequency transcranial random noise stimulation (lf-tRNS) and sham. The anodal electrode was placed over the scalp location Oz and the cathodal electrode was placed over Cz. In each session, participants underwent three 12 minute resting-state fMRI scans with their eyes open. tES was applied only during the second scan. Changes in functional connectivity with early visual areas during stimulation was defined as the contrast between the second and first scans, and changes in the connectivity after stimulation was defined as the contrast between the third and first scans. The results showed that (1) tDCS to the visual cortex induced an increase in functional connectivity with cerebellum and decreases in functional connectivity with right SMA and right inferior temporal gyrus during stimulation, (2) tDCS to the visual cortex induced a decrease in functional connectivity with right inferior temporal gyrus after stimulation and (3) tACS to the visual cortex induced an increase in functional connectivity with right-frontal pole after stimulation. These data suggest that tES changes the functional connections of visual processing areas, and that some of these effects are persistent after termination of the stimulation. We will further discuss implications of tES to visual cortex and its effects on the cortical networks.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2017

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×