September 2017
Volume 17, Issue 10
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2017
PERCEPTUAL LEARNING OF FACES: A REHABILITATIVE STUDY OF DEVELOPMENTAL PROSOPAGNOSIA
Author Affiliations
  • Sherryse Corrow
    Departments of Neurology, Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of British Columbia
  • Jodie Davies-Thompson
    Affiliation: NIHR Nottingham Hearing Biomedical Research Unit, Division of Clinical Neuroscience, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, UK
  • Kimberly Fletcher
    Department of Clinical Neuropsychology, Derby Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Derby, UK
  • Jeffrey Corrow
    Departments of Neurology, Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of British Columbia
  • Charlotte Hills
    Departments of Neurology, Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of British Columbia
  • Brad Duchaine
    Psychological and Brain Sciences, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH
  • Jason Barton
    Departments of Neurology, Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of British Columbia
Journal of Vision August 2017, Vol.17, 625. doi:10.1167/17.10.625
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      Sherryse Corrow, Jodie Davies-Thompson, Kimberly Fletcher, Jeffrey Corrow, Charlotte Hills, Brad Duchaine, Jason Barton; PERCEPTUAL LEARNING OF FACES: A REHABILITATIVE STUDY OF DEVELOPMENTAL PROSOPAGNOSIA. Journal of Vision 2017;17(10):625. doi: 10.1167/17.10.625.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

In recent years, several attempts have been made to improve face recognition in developmental prosopagnosia. These efforts have often resulted in training effects that are either not long lasting, or do not generalize to novel viewpoints, expressions, or identities. We used a perceptual learning approach to train face recognition in a group of 7 participants with developmental prosopagnosia. Four completed the 11-week training program first, followed by an 11-week non-training period and three completed an 11-week control task followed by the training program. On each trial of the training program, participants selected which of two test faces appeared most similar to a simultaneously presented target face. A staircase procedure was used to ensure that each participant was training at an individually appropriate level—as performance improved, faces become more similar, and when performance declined, faces became less similar. With each week of training, variation across viewpoint and expression were gradually introduced. Performance on post-tests improved significantly more during the training period than non-training period for both trained faces (p< 0.001) and untrained faces (p< 0.05), suggesting that the program produced effects that generalized across novel viewpoints, expressions, and identities. At the individual level, some participants reported improvements in their everyday experiences as well. In sum, perceptually learning may be an effective approach for improving face recognition in developmental prosopagnosia.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2017

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