September 2017
Volume 17, Issue 10
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2017
Action video games improve reading and cross-modal attentional shifting as well as phonological skills in English-speaking children with dyslexia
Author Affiliations
  • Andrea Facoetti
    University of Padua, Italy
  • Piergiorgio Trevisan
    University of Udine Italy
  • Luca Ronconi
    University of Trento Italy
  • Sara Bertoni
    University of Padua, Italy
  • Susan Colmar
    University of Sidney Australia
  • Kit Double
    University of Sidney Australia
  • Chiara Andreola
    E Medea Scientific Institute Italy
  • Simone Gori
    University of Bergamo Italy
  • Sandro Franceschini
    University of Padua, Italy
Journal of Vision August 2017, Vol.17, 639. doi:10.1167/17.10.639
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      Andrea Facoetti, Piergiorgio Trevisan, Luca Ronconi, Sara Bertoni, Susan Colmar, Kit Double, Chiara Andreola, Simone Gori, Sandro Franceschini; Action video games improve reading and cross-modal attentional shifting as well as phonological skills in English-speaking children with dyslexia. Journal of Vision 2017;17(10):639. doi: 10.1167/17.10.639.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Dyslexia is the most common neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by difficulties in learning to read. Action video games (AVG) improve reading efficiency in Italian children with dyslexia, without any direct phonological or orthographic stimulation. However, which mechanism underlying this improvement and the extent to which AVG training would be beneficial in deep English orthography, remain two critical questions. For an efficient reading acquisition children have to integrate written letters with speech sounds, rapidly shifting their attention from visual to auditory modality. Here, we tested reading and phonological skills, audio-visual processing, visual-to-auditory and auditory-to-visual attentional shifting in two matched groups of English-speaking children with dyslexia before and after they played AVG or non action video games. Words recognition and phonological decoding speed increased only playing AVG. Audio-visual processing and visual-to-auditory attentional shifting also ameliorated after AVG training. This unconventional reading remediation program reduced also phonological short-term-memory and phonemes blending deficits. Consequently, the typical auditory-phonological disorders associated to dyslexia also improved playing AVG. Our findings demonstrate that a specific acceleration of audio-visual processing and visual-to-auditory attentional shifting can directly translate into better reading and phonological working memory in English-speaking children with dyslexia.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2017

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