September 2017
Volume 17, Issue 10
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2017
Point me in the right direction: Lateralization of change detection in hierarchical visual stimuli.
Author Affiliations
  • Bonnie Angelone
    Department of Psychology, College of Science and Mathematics, Rowan University
  • Connor Burrows
    Department of Psychology, College of Science and Mathematics, Rowan University
Journal of Vision August 2017, Vol.17, 968. doi:10.1167/17.10.968
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      Bonnie Angelone, Connor Burrows; Point me in the right direction: Lateralization of change detection in hierarchical visual stimuli.. Journal of Vision 2017;17(10):968. doi: 10.1167/17.10.968.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

The lateralization of visual processing between the hemispheres is commonly applied to hierarchical visual image processing. Lesions to the temporal-parietal left hemisphere disrupt local-level (i.e. fine detail) processing, while lesions to the temporal-parietal area of the right hemisphere lead to deficits in global-level (i.e. big picture) visual processing. Despite this, previous behavioral, functional, and event-related potential research has provided conflicting evidence for the existence of differences in the processing of visual information across the hemispheres. Some researchers have behaviorally demonstrated lateralization across the hemispheres, while others have found tenuous associations between hierarchical level, visual field, and hemispheric. Some modulating factors affecting the lateralization of hierarchical visual information have been identified. The occurrence of lateralized asymmetry may depend on stimulus category; asymmetrical processing was observed in alphabetic hierarchical stimuli, but not in hierarchical stimuli comprised of objects. The present study sought to behaviorally assess the presence of asymmetric lateralization of processing in a selective attention change-detection task using objects. Participants viewed hierarchical stimuli in the shape of an arrow. At the global level, a large arrow pointed in a certain direction while at the local level, smaller arrows pointed in a certain direction. Participants received 2 blocks of trials with an arrow to the right (left hemisphere) or left (right hemisphere) and were asked to report whether there was a change in direction of the arrow (global) or arrows (local). When global was presented first, global stimulus processing was faster and more accurate in the left hemisphere and local stimulus processing was faster and more accurate in the right hemisphere. The same differences were not apparent when the local block was presented first. There may be inherent differences between hemispheric lateralization for hierarchal change detection compared to hierarchal target detection in a selective attention task.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2017

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