September 2017
Volume 17, Issue 10
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2017
Reactivation of a previous target location: a new event-related potential component
Author Affiliations
  • Hayley Lagroix
    Department of Psychology, Simon Fraser University
  • Nadja Jankovic
    Department of Psychology, Simon Fraser University
  • Aaron Richardson
    Department of Psychology, Simon Fraser University
  • Kevin Boyd
    Department of Psychology, Simon Fraser University
  • Vincent Di Lollo
    Department of Psychology, Simon Fraser University
  • Thomas Spalek
    Department of Psychology, Simon Fraser University
Journal of Vision August 2017, Vol.17, 978. doi:10.1167/17.10.978
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      Hayley Lagroix, Nadja Jankovic, Aaron Richardson, Kevin Boyd, Vincent Di Lollo, Thomas Spalek; Reactivation of a previous target location: a new event-related potential component. Journal of Vision 2017;17(10):978. doi: 10.1167/17.10.978.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

When two events occur in close temporal succession, processing of one can affect the processing of the other. We discovered a novel electrophysiological component that may elucidate such inter-event interactions. Participants viewed two displays (S1 and S2) shown sequentially in different locations. S1 and S2 each consisted of a target and a distractor presented either on the horizontal or vertical meridian. A pronounced event-related potential positivity, lateralized to the location of the S1 target, was evoked by the onset of S2, which appeared 100-1100 ms after S1. We refer to this component as re-activation positivity (PR). In follow-up experiments, we explored the processes that may be indexed by the PR. To examine whether the PR indexes disengagement of attention from the S1-target location upon presentation of S2, an irrelevant fixation cross was inserted in the display sequence between S1 and S2. The critical finding was that the PR was elicited by both the fixation cross and by the subsequent S2, providing evidence against an attentional disengagement account. On the alternate hypothesis that the PR represents reactivation of a spatially-specific memory of the S1 target, we examined whether the PR would occur if attention were directed to the S1-target location, but that location did not contain an item to be remembered. On half the trials, a colour oddball within a circular array of otherwise homogeneously-coloured rings contained a line segment, the orientation of which was to be remembered. On the other half of the trials, the oddball ring was empty, hence there was nothing to remember, and no response was required. The S2 display consisted of a digit presented at fixation 700 ms after S1. The PR was elicited by S2 on all trials, suggesting that maintenance of the S1-target in memory is also not essential for eliciting the PR.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2017

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