September 2017
Volume 17, Issue 10
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2017
The attentional blink reveals discrete perceptual transitions, whereas both spatial and temporal cueing show graded attentional effects
Author Affiliations
  • Christopher Asplund
    Division of Social Sciences, Yale-NUS College
    Singapore Institute of Neurotechnology
  • Joan Ongchoco
    Division of Social Sciences, Yale-NUS College
  • Gwenisha Liaw
    Singapore Institute of Neurotechnology
  • John Reid
    Division of Social Sciences, Yale-NUS College
Journal of Vision August 2017, Vol.17, 1193. doi:10.1167/17.10.1193
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      Christopher Asplund, Joan Ongchoco, Gwenisha Liaw, John Reid; The attentional blink reveals discrete perceptual transitions, whereas both spatial and temporal cueing show graded attentional effects. Journal of Vision 2017;17(10):1193. doi: 10.1167/17.10.1193.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Visual attention can be deployed across space or time, potentially altering the appearance or probability of perceiving stimuli. Carrasco, Ling, & Read (2004) showed that spatial attention increased the perceived contrast of Gabor patches, whereas Asplund et al. (2014) showed that temporal attention affected only the probability of perceiving a color or face target in the attentional blink. Here we adopted Carrasco et al.'s psychophysical approach and stimuli to test whether temporal attention--altered either with cues or the attentional blink--could also have graded effects on conscious perception. After replicating the spatial attention findings, we used rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) streams of Gabor patches to explore the effects of temporal attention. On each trial, participants reported how many obliquely angled, target Gabor patches were present (0, 1, or 2), and, when two were reported, which patch had the higher contrast. In a temporal cueing experiment, four-dot cues presented 120 ms before one of the targets increased its perceived contrast. In an attentional blink experiment, however, lag (3 or 8) affected only the number of perceived Gabors, not their relative perceived contrasts. These findings support the idea that different forms of attention can affect perception in a graded fashion, particularly at earlier stages of visual processing. By contrast, the attentional blink represents a limitation at central stages of visual cognition, where conscious perception emerges in an all-or-none fashion.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2017

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