September 2017
Volume 17, Issue 10
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2017
MEG decoding reveals the representational dynamics of task context in visual processing
Author Affiliations
  • Martin Hebart
    Laboratory of Brain and Cognition, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institute of Health
  • Brett Bankson
    Laboratory of Brain and Cognition, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institute of Health
  • Assaf Harel
    Department of Psychology, Wright State University
  • Chris Baker
    Laboratory of Brain and Cognition, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institute of Health
    contributed equally
  • Radoslaw Cichy
    Department of Psychology and Education, Free University Berlin
    contributed equally
Journal of Vision August 2017, Vol.17, 1342. doi:10.1167/17.10.1342
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Martin Hebart, Brett Bankson, Assaf Harel, Chris Baker, Radoslaw Cichy; MEG decoding reveals the representational dynamics of task context in visual processing. Journal of Vision 2017;17(10):1342. doi: 10.1167/17.10.1342.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

We are constantly faced with goals that require us to process the same visual stimuli according to different task demands. While much attention has been paid to the perceptual processing of visual stimuli, much less is known about the processing of the task context in which these stimuli occur. Here we used MEG to study the temporal evolution of task representations and their effect on visual category processing. During MEG recordings, participants (N = 17) were shown 8 visually-presented objects embedded in one of four task contexts. Multivariate classification was carried out in a time-resolved manner both for task and category. We found that after presentation of the object stimulus, object information increased rapidly as expected. In contrast, task information increased relatively slowly, peaking around 500 ms post stimulus onset. Using temporal cross-classification, we demonstrate that task context is processed in multiple, distinguishable but partially overlapping stages. To better understand the spatial distribution of task and category information, we used model-based MEG-fMRI fusion (Cichy et al., 2014, Nat. Neurosci.) by combining our MEG data with the results of a previous fMRI study (Harel et al., 2014, PNAS). While early visual cortex exhibited preferential processing of stimulus information and lateral prefrontal cortex preferential processing of task context, we found co-varying task and category information in ventral temporal cortex, indicating that task context may affect visual processing in these brain regions. Together, our results reveal a relatively late involvement of task context in visual processing and highlight the representational dynamics of task context.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2017

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×