September 2017
Volume 17, Issue 10
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2017
Further evidence for the global processing of random phase radial frequency patterns.
Author Affiliations
  • Robert Green
    School of Psychology, The University of Western Australia
  • James Dickinson
    School of Psychology, The University of Western Australia
  • David Badcock
    School of Psychology, The University of Western Australia
Journal of Vision August 2017, Vol.17, 1386. doi:10.1167/17.10.1386
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Robert Green, James Dickinson, David Badcock; Further evidence for the global processing of random phase radial frequency patterns.. Journal of Vision 2017;17(10):1386. doi: 10.1167/17.10.1386.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

The detection and recognition of combinations of lines and curves composing simple shapes is a primary function of the human visual system. Previously, researchers have used circular contours with sinusoidal deformation of the radius (radial frequency (RF) patterns) to investigate the underlying processing involved in simple shape perception. It was suggested that these patterns exhibited global processing, improvement in detection of modulation for larger extents of modulated contour which could not be accounted for probabilistically. However, recent research has questioned the global processing of RF patterns (Baldwin, Schmidtmann, Kingdom, & Hess, 2016) and suggested that processing of these patterns is similar to that of modulated lines (Mullen, Beaudot, & Ivanov, 2011). The current study investigates these claims using fixed phase (where the local elements have spatial certainty), and random phase (where the local elements have spatial uncertainty) for both RF patterns, and modulated lines. Thresholds were collected for eight naïve observers and compared to probability summation estimates calculated using both high threshold theory and signal detection theory. Results demonstrated strong evidence for the global processing of random phase RF patterns and evidence for an interaction between local and global cues for fixed phase RF patterns. We also found an increase in sensitivity between 1, and 2 cycles of modulation, but not between 2, and 3 cycles of modulation for the modulated line stimuli. The results provide further evidence for the global processing of random phase RF patterns and indicate that RF patterns and modulated lines are processed differently.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2017

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×