September 2018
Volume 18, Issue 10
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2018
The Contrast Sensitivity Function in children: Bayesian adaptive estimation using QUEST+
Author Affiliations
  • Mahtab Farahbakhsh
    Institute of Ophthalmology, University College London (UCL), UK.
  • Tessa Dekker
    Institute of Ophthalmology, University College London (UCL), UK.
  • Pete Jones
    Institute of Ophthalmology, University College London (UCL), UK.NIHR Moorfields Biomedical Research Centre, London, UK.
Journal of Vision September 2018, Vol.18, 210. doi:10.1167/18.10.210
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      Mahtab Farahbakhsh, Tessa Dekker, Pete Jones; The Contrast Sensitivity Function in children: Bayesian adaptive estimation using QUEST+. Journal of Vision 2018;18(10):210. doi: 10.1167/18.10.210.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

In clinical vision-science, we currently lack a robust, child-friendly measure of the Contrast Sensitivity Function (CSF). Traditional psychophysical techniques (e.g., Transformed Staircases; Method of Constant Stimuli) are too slow, and are prone to be misled by lapses. Recently, Bayesian adaptive estimation has been suggested as a potential solution (e.g., the "qCSF"). Here, we evaluate a novel implementation of Bayesian adaptive CSF estimation, using QUEST+. We implemented two versions of the QUEST+ method: (1) with prior assumptions about the shape of CSF, and (2) without prior assumptions about the shape of CSF (i.e., flat prior assumption). To assess our test's accuracy, we asked 41 4-14-year-old Children and 13 adults to complete the two versions of our QUEST+ CSF tests and an adaptive staircase CSF test. There was a good correspondence in contrast sensitivities (i.e., the peak of the CSF curve) measured with QUEST+ and the staircase. In addition, there were no significant differences between estimates from the two QUEST+ methods. In a second experiment, we assessed test-retest reliability by asking 18 6-10-year-old children and 15 adults to complete each test twice. All methods exhibited similar test-retest reliability as indicated by Bland-Altman analyses. Finally, we performed an age comparison of contrast sensitivity across children. This revealed a ~1.5 dB/year increase between 4-14 years. However, this developmental effect was small relative to the individual variability across subjects (i.e., between-subjects, contrast sensitivity ranged from 10 to 44 dB). These results show that it is feasible to obtain accurate, fast, and reliable measures of the CSF in children using the QUEST+ method. This offers potential improvements over gold standard tests currently used for diagnosis and treatment outcome of childhood eye disease.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2018

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