September 2018
Volume 18, Issue 10
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2018
Preserving the global effect across a saccade
Author Affiliations
  • Kiki Arkesteijn
    Department of Experimental and Applied Psychology, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, The NetherlandsDepartment of Human Movement Sciences, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  • Jeroen Smeets
    Department of Human Movement Sciences, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  • Mieke Donk
    Department of Experimental and Applied Psychology, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  • Artem Belopolsky
    Department of Experimental and Applied Psychology, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Journal of Vision September 2018, Vol.18, 374. doi:10.1167/18.10.374
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    • Get Citation

      Kiki Arkesteijn, Jeroen Smeets, Mieke Donk, Artem Belopolsky; Preserving the global effect across a saccade. Journal of Vision 2018;18(10):374. doi: 10.1167/18.10.374.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

When a distractor is presented in close spatial proximity to a target, a saccade tends to land in between the two objects rather than on the target. This 'global effect' is thought to reflect unresolved competition between target and distractor. It is unclear whether the global effect persists across saccades since a saccade displaces the retinotopic representations of target and distractor. In the present study participants performed a sequence of a horizontal and a vertical saccade and the global effect was induced by presenting a distractor next to the second saccade target. This distractor was removed during the first saccade. On half of the trials, the second target also disappeared after the first saccade, resulting in a memory-guided second saccade. On these trials, the second saccade showed a global effect, despite the disappearance of the distractor after the first saccade. Without correction based on a visible target location, the global effect was stable over hundreds of milliseconds. This suggests that the biased saccade plan was remapped across the first saccade. However, when the second target remained present after the first saccade, the bias was corrected and the global effect was eliminated, even for saccades with the shortest intersaccadic intervals.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2018

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