September 2018
Volume 18, Issue 10
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2018
Chromatic differences between colours retrieved from RGB and hyperspectral images
Author Affiliations
  • Joao Linhares
    Centre of Physics, University of Minho, Portugal
  • Cristina Montagner
    Centre of Physics, University of Minho, Portugal
  • Ana Bailão
    Centre of Physics, University of Minho, PortugalFaculty of Fine Arts, University of Lisbon, Portugal
  • Nobuyo Okada
    Toyohashi City Museum Art and history, JAPAN
  • Kanako Maruchi
    Toyohashi City Museum Art and history, JAPAN
  • Taisei Kondo
    Toyohashi University of Technology, JAPAN
  • Shigeki Nakauchi
    Toyohashi University of Technology, JAPAN
  • Sérgio Nascimento
    Centre of Physics, University of Minho, Portugal
Journal of Vision September 2018, Vol.18, 588. doi:10.1167/18.10.588
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      Joao Linhares, Cristina Montagner, Ana Bailão, Nobuyo Okada, Kanako Maruchi, Taisei Kondo, Shigeki Nakauchi, Sérgio Nascimento; Chromatic differences between colours retrieved from RGB and hyperspectral images. Journal of Vision 2018;18(10):588. doi: 10.1167/18.10.588.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

The common RGB digital camera (DC) is able to compress all the surrounding spectral information into a trichromatic system capable of represented the majority of the perceived colours. It follows the same compression philosophy as the human eye, where the spectral information is compressed into a three-dimensional color system. Despite the same apparent solution to compress the spectral information, the human eye and the DCs possess different spectral sensitivities and, in the end, provide different chromatic experiences. To which extend the human eye and the DCs provide the same chromatic capabilities, is still an open question. The spectral information of 50 hyperspectral images of natural scenes and 78 art paintings was used to estimate the chromatic differences between the human eye and a DC assuming the CIE D65 illuminant and the CIE1931 2° standard observer. The human eye chromatic diversity was estimated by computing the tristimulus values from the reflectance data. The DC chromatic diversity was estimated by assuming the spectral sensitivity of the DC to estimate the RGB colour from the spectral data and then converting it into the tristimulus values. The CIELAB chromaticity coordinates were then computed, as the pixel colour difference (∆E*ab) between the human eye and the DC. The ∆E*ab was assumed as a metric of the chromatic differences. It was found that the chromatic differences between the two systems were higher for paintings than for natural scenes. A Pseudo Voigt fit to the frequency distributions of the ∆E*ab between the human eye and the DC estimated the peak at about 6.70 (±0.06) and 3.56 (±0.07) ∆E*ab for art paintings and natural scenes, respectively. These results seem to indicate that DCs may provide better chromatic estimations on natural scenarios than on art paintings, when compared with the accuracy of hyperspectral imaging.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2018

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