September 2018
Volume 18, Issue 10
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2018
Cortical reorganization but no recovery of visual function following an optic nerve injury in mice
Author Affiliations
  • Jacqueline Higgins
    Laboratoire de neurobiologie de la cognition visuelle, École d'optométrie, Université de Montréal
  • Marianne Groleau
    Laboratoire de neurobiologie de la cognition visuelle, École d'optométrie, Université de Montréal
  • Jérôme Anton
    Laboratoire de neurobiologie de la cognition visuelle, École d'optométrie, Université de Montréal
  • Mojtaba Nazari
    Department of Neuroscience, University of Lethbridge, Canadian Centre for Behavioural Neuroscience
  • Matthieu Vanni
    Department of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia, Brain Research Centre and Djavad Mowafaghian Centre for Brain Health
  • Majid Mohajerani
    Department of Neuroscience, University of Lethbridge, Canadian Centre for Behavioural Neuroscience
  • Elvire Vaucher
    Laboratoire de neurobiologie de la cognition visuelle, École d'optométrie, Université de Montréal
Journal of Vision September 2018, Vol.18, 769. doi:10.1167/18.10.769
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    • Get Citation

      Jacqueline Higgins, Marianne Groleau, Jérôme Anton, Mojtaba Nazari, Matthieu Vanni, Majid Mohajerani, Elvire Vaucher; Cortical reorganization but no recovery of visual function following an optic nerve injury in mice. Journal of Vision 2018;18(10):769. doi: 10.1167/18.10.769.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Visual deficits by ocular disease or visual system trauma cause lasting damage. To better understand the involvement of cortical plasticity in vision restoration, we aim to evaluate the cortical and visual networks following a deficit over time. A partial optic nerve crush (pONC) serves as an induced visual deficit, allowing for residual vision from surviving cells and cortical plasticity. Thy1-GCaMP6s mice underwent in vivo calcium imaging prior to a bilateral pONC, then 1, 3, 5, 7, 14, 23, and 30 days after. Neuronal responses to monocular light flashes were measured in various cortical visual areas, and correlations between responses were performed. Independently, visual acuity was measured in mice using the optokinetic reflex test in response to moving gratings prior to a bilateral pONC, then 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days after. Surviving retinal cells were counted. Following the pONC, the cortical response to the stimulus decreased in V1 and secondary visual areas. Some activity was regained at 3-5 days following the pONC. A loss of correlation between cortical visual areas was also observed, but a recorrelation began around day 5. However, this reorganization was not associated with proportional restoration of visual acuity. There was a drop in the number of surviving ganglion cells following the pONC. Using a lighter pONC intensity showed a partial recovery between days 3-7, and a greater cell survival compared to a strong pONC. There is evidence of cortical reorganization between visual areas following the pONC, indicating that plasticity can occur at the cortical level. The optokinetic reflex test showed a significant visual loss following the pONC, but no recovery. However, a behavioural recovery could be obtained with a lighter crush, suggesting that residual cells may be needed for recovery. This indicates that visual loss and plasticity can be observed behaviourally.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2018

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