September 2018
Volume 18, Issue 10
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2018
Age effects on category rule learning
Author Affiliations
  • Clay Killingsworth
    Department of Psychology, College of Sciences, University of Central Florida
  • Audrey Hill
    Department of Psychology, College of Sciences, University of Central Florida
  • Pooja Patel
    Department of Psychology, College of Sciences, University of Central Florida
  • Anna Guidubaldi
    Department of Psychology, College of Sciences, University of Central Florida
  • Drew Gillett
    Department of Psychology, College of Sciences, University of Central Florida
  • Mark Neider
    Department of Psychology, College of Sciences, University of Central Florida
  • Corey Bohil
    Department of Psychology, College of Sciences, University of Central Florida
Journal of Vision September 2018, Vol.18, 775. doi:10.1167/18.10.775
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      Clay Killingsworth, Audrey Hill, Pooja Patel, Anna Guidubaldi, Drew Gillett, Mark Neider, Corey Bohil; Age effects on category rule learning. Journal of Vision 2018;18(10):775. doi: 10.1167/18.10.775.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

A growing literature suggests that separate learning systems may be differently affected by cognitive aging. We conducted two experiments comparing young and older adults on category rule learning. In Experiment 1, two-dimensional stimuli (lines varying in length and orientation) were learned according to either an explicit (verbalizable) rule requiring selective attention to one dimension or an implicit rule requiring integration of dimensions. In Experiment 2, participants categorized 4-dimensional color/shape stimuli (a modified Wisconsin Card Sorting Task) according to explicit or implicit rules. In both experiments, accuracy was higher for young adults than for older adults. In both experiments accuracy was higher for rule-based than for information integration categories, and this difference was more pronounced for older adults. In Experiment 2 (card sorting), older adults required more trials to reach an accuracy criterion. Decision bound modeling indicated that a greater proportion of older adults adopted suboptimal decision rule types.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2018

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