September 2018
Volume 18, Issue 10
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2018
How to classify visual illusions? The role of intellectual development.
Author Affiliations
  • Aline Cretenoud
    Laboratory of Psychophysics, Brain Mind Institute, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne, Switzerland
  • Lukasz Grzeczkowski
    Allgemeine und Experimentelle Psychologie, Department Psychologie, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Munich, Germany
  • Michael Herzog
    Laboratory of Psychophysics, Brain Mind Institute, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne, Switzerland
Journal of Vision September 2018, Vol.18, 776. doi:10.1167/18.10.776
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      Aline Cretenoud, Lukasz Grzeczkowski, Michael Herzog; How to classify visual illusions? The role of intellectual development.. Journal of Vision 2018;18(10):776. doi: 10.1167/18.10.776.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Vision scientists have tried to classify visual illusions for a long time. Piaget (1969) proposed that visual illusions can be classified into two groups, depending whether the illusion magnitude decreases or increases with age and intellectual development. These two groups are called primary and secondary illusions, respectively. Contrary to primary illusions, which are supposed to be innate, secondary illusions are thought to be acquired: daily experience with perspective cues enhances our susceptibility to them. Here, we tested illusion magnitudes for the Ponzo and Müller-Lyer illusions with three different complexity levels. We used a classic version of these illusions ("low" complexity), the illusions embedded into line drawing perspective ("intermediary" complexity) and their corresponding real world versions ("high" complexity). A linear model based on data from 86 observers with ages ranging from 6 to 66 years did not reveal any significant effect of the interaction between age and complexity. Illusion magnitudes of the three Müller-Lyer illusions were significantly correlated and the same is true for the Ponzo illusion, suggesting that each illusion makes up its own factor.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2018

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